How to deal with my partner who had a parent who is mentally ill?

He is showing signs what I think is Dementia.. it has made our relationship very Hard to co with.. her and I will offten Argue.. it breaks my heart to watch my woman be so hurt we go at each other
Asked by E
Answered
11/29/2021

It is very difficult to deal with a loved one who is developing dementia. A medical diagnosis should be made by the doctor. There are many stages of dementia and each one is different and can be confusing for the family. If your loved one is in the early stages of dementia, he or she may not require much care. This is a good time for you to learn about your relative’s dementia and what you can expect. Also, it’s a good idea for you, your relative, and your other family members to plan for the future while your loved one can still make sound decisions. If your loved one is in the middle stages of dementia, keep the environment safe. Stick to a daily routine. Read the tips below for ideas about how to cope with new demands and personality changes associated with dementia. Dementia affects your loved one’s ability to communicate thoughts and emotions. Your loved one may not know how to tell you what he or she needs. He or she may not understand what you want when you ask a question or make a request. This can be frustrating. Follow these tips to reduce stress and improve communication: Be positive. Keep your tone of voice and body language calm. Control your facial expressions. Speak in a pleasant manner. And use touch to give your loved one affection. Be clear. Get your loved one’s attention. Speak slowly and calmly. Use simple words and phrases. You may have to repeat the information or question multiple times. Don’t get frustrated when this happens. Ask yes or no questions. Avoid giving choices if there are none. Acknowledge feelings. If your loved one is sad, angry, or upset, don’t ignore it. Let him or her know that you understand as you work to calm them. For example, you might say, “I can see that you are frustrated. Let’s go for a walk.” Path to improved well being Communicate Dementia affects your loved one’s ability to communicate thoughts and emotions. Your loved one may not know how to tell you what he or she needs. He or she may not understand what you want when you ask a question or make a request. This can be frustrating. Follow these tips to reduce stress and improve communication: Be positive. Keep your tone of voice and body language calm. Control your facial expressions. Speak in a pleasant manner. And use touch to give your loved one affection. Be clear. Get your loved one’s attention. Speak slowly and calmly. Use simple words and phrases. You may have to repeat the information or question multiple times. Don’t get frustrated when this happens. Ask yes or no questions. Avoid giving choices if there are none. Acknowledge feelings. If your loved one is sad, angry, or upset, don’t ignore it. Let him or her know that you understand as you work to calm them. For example, you might say, “I can see that you are frustrated. Let’s go for a walk.” Take care of yourself As the caregiver of a person who has dementia, you must first take care of yourself. If you become too tired and frustrated, you will be less able to help your family member. If you need a break, try the following: Ask for help from relatives, friends, and local community organizations. Look for caregiver support groups. Other people who are dealing with the same problems may have good ideas about how to cope and make it easier. Consider respite care. Respite care is short-term care that is given to a person who has dementia. This provides a brief break for the caregiver. This service may be available through a local senior living group. Also, it may be provided by a social services agency. Consider adult daycare centers. These centers can provide your family member with a consistent environment. Also, it gives him or her a chance to socialize. There is a litany of things to consider which will take much more time to understand. I would be happy to help anyone going through this with a loved one.

(LMHC, NCMHC)