Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment Of Melancholic Depression

Updated September 7, 2022 by BetterHelp Editorial Team

Content warning: Please be advisedthatthis article contains mentions of suicidal ideation. If you or a loved one are experiencing suicidal thoughts, reach out for help immediately. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255, and is available 24/7.

We all experience feelings of melancholia on occasion. When we lose a job or go through a tough breakup, we can find ourselves feeling sad and hopeless. While these feelings are a normal part of being a human, if they persist and begin to affect your everyday life negatively, you may have what is known as melancholic depression.

What Is Melancholic Depression?

Melancholic depression (also known as depression with melancholic features) is one of many mood disorders characterized by overwhelming and intense feelings of sadness and hopelessness, even when there is seemingly no catalyst. In the past, melancholic depression was characterized as a distinct disorder by the American Psychiatric Association. However, now it is seen as a form of major depressive disorder (MDD).

According to medically reviewed research, MDD, as an aspect of behavioral health, affects every area of life, including work, school, and interpersonal relationships. Those going through depression will often lose interest in hobbies and activities they once enjoyed and may cut off contact with those closest to them. Out of nowhere, those with melancholic depression often lose interest in everything for extended periods of time.

Melancholic Depression Symptoms

Are Feelings Of Sadness And Hopelessness Plaguing Your Thoughts?

Since melancholic depression is a form of major depression, melancholic symptoms are very similar to regular depression symptoms. However, some people with this condition do experience severe symptoms, so this is not a condition to take lightly. Below are some of the most common melancholic depression symptoms.

Chronic Depressed Mood And Feelings Of Melancholy

As with the various types of non-melancholic depression, melancholic depression is primarily characterized by the presence of persistent feelings of sadness and hopelessness. However, people with this condition will also experience melancholic features, which include:

  • Feelings of despair and worthlessness
  • Lack of reactivity to positive news
  • Feelings of excessive guilt
  • Absence of happiness or joy

Complete Loss Of Interest In Activities Once Enjoyed

Even surrounded by positive events, great friends, and activities they once found pleasure in, those going through extreme depression feel no happiness. Events that they once looked forward to are now simply neutral. Even if a day is seemingly ‘good,’ or if they receive wonderful news, it doesn’t alleviate depression.

Thoughts Of Self-harm

While not a symptom in everyone diagnosed with depression, those with more extreme depression may have thoughts of suicide or self-harm, as a brain health problem, melancholic depression can spur threats to human health.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

Disruption In Sleep Patterns

Depression can negatively affect sleep patterns, either leaving the person too sad to get out of bed (leading to excessive sleep) or disrupting sleep entirely (leading to a lack of sleep).

Significant Weight Loss

Loss of interest in most things includes lack of interest in food. Often, peer-reviewed studies show that those with melancholic depression will lose their appetite, leading to significant weight loss.

Trouble Concentrating, Lack Of Energy, And Inability To Make Decisions

Medically reviewed studies consider fatigue a very common symptom of melancholic depression, and even the simplest tasks can seem extremely difficult. It can also be difficult to concentrate on anything or make decisions because there doesn’t seem to be any reason to move forward. Therefore cognitive function decreases, which makes it much harder for a person with this condition to think quickly or make decisions.

Feelings Of Guilt

Another symptom that differentiates melancholic depression from major depressive disorder is feelings of excessive guilt. These feelings of guilt are not brought on by a certain situation or event but rather linked to past experiences or the worry of doing something wrong in the future.

Symptoms Worse In The Morning

As opposed to major depressive disorder, melancholic depression is characterized by worse symptoms in the mornings. This may lead to difficulty getting out of bed and an inability to face the day ahead. Symptoms may begin to recede slightly as the day goes on and be easier to cope with than they were hours earlier. However, not everyone experiences morning melancholic features. Instead, melancholic depression may be more consistent throughout the day.

What Causes Melancholic Depression?

The important thing to note in behavioral health is that melancholia specific traumatic events don't cause melancholic depression; a traumatic event can trigger depression that may have been lying dormant. Biological factors cause this type of depression; in some cases, it may have been inherited from parents. Those with other mental disorders where psychotic symptoms are present are thought to be more susceptible to this type of depression and elderly patients with dementia.

How Is Melancholic Depression Diagnosed?

As opposed to physical illnesses, diagnosing mental illnesses isn’t as clear-cut of a process. Doctors can’t simply take an x-ray, analyze a blood sample or see any physical problems. Instead, they rely on a handful of questions that will allow them to determine whether the patient is truly depressed or is simply going through a difficult time.

The patient will be required to talk about a typical day - their behaviors, emotions, thoughts, and overall lifestyle. The doctor will try to dig deeper, asking if they have experienced any traumatic events either recently or in the past that may be contributing to feelings of melancholy. Gathering information on the history of mental illnesses in the family will also be helpful since mental illnesses are often hereditary.

To be diagnosed with melancholic depression, you must be exhibiting at least five of the above symptoms for at least two weeks straight. Before making a diagnosis, a doctor will try to rule out any physical illnesses that may be indirectly causing feelings of depression. Afterward, you will be subjected to proper case management processes.

How Is Melancholic Depression Treated?

Luckily, there are many options for treating melancholic depression. They primarily include talk therapy with mental health professionals or medication management.

Medication - Many patients diagnosed with melancholic depression will be put on medication. Some common options include tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. These medication options regulate serotonin and dopamine levels in the brain, bringing the mind back to a manageable state. Based on medically reviewed research, antidepressants typically take between 2-4 weeks before they begin to work, and during that time, suicidal thoughts may increase before emotions are regulated. It’s important to stay in contact with your doctor and let them know if you feel as though suicidal thoughts have increased. It is also important to not stop taking antidepressants even when you begin to feel better until your doctor approves and helps you reduce your dosage gradually.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

There are many different types of antidepressants and other medication options, and it may take a bit of time for a doctor to find the right dosage and medication for you. Proper case management also requires that doctors undertake an in-depth analysis of your behavioral health to recommend the best treatment.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) acknowledges that the way we think and behave affects our everyday life. It pinpoints clinical patterns of negative thought in behavioral health and changes them back into more positive thought patterns. A therapist will help you take the steps necessary to restructure the way you think. Since melancholic depression is so severe, CBT is often combined with medication or other types of psychological treatment.

Interpersonal Therapy - Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) focuses on your interpersonal relationships and pinpoints areas that may be exacerbating your symptoms of depression. This type of therapy aims to help patients improve their relationships or alter their expectations of them. IPT also aims to help develop a stronger support network to deal with symptoms of depression more easily and help you manage your behavioral health.

In addition to these treatment options, there are other treatments that are less popular but still effective. Some alternative safe and effective treatment options include electroconvulsive therapy, family therapy, and talking with support groups. Talk to your doctor, therapist, or other wellness professionals to learn more about the treatment outcome and immediate risk of all the mentioned treatment options above.

Learning to manage melancholic depression is a long process, but there is hope. If a loved one of yours is going through depression, it’s important to convince them to get the help they need as soon as possible. While it may be a long road to recovery, the combination of medication, psychological treatment, and a strong support system can help alleviate symptoms and help them get on the path to a happier, healthier life. It’s very important to remain a supportive confidante throughout the entire process; people living with depression often feel worthless, and it’s important to remind them that they are not alone. Acknowledging that a problem is the first step, and making that initial appointment is the most difficult part. Afterward, everything else is a step in the right direction.

Are Feelings Of Sadness And Hopelessness Plaguing Your Thoughts?

If you feel as though you are experiencing melancholic depression, seek help from a national center today. The trained therapists at BetterHelp are available 24/7 to discuss your symptoms and provide treatment, and there is no need to leave the comfort of your own home. You can remain anonymous, talk with a professional you feel comfortable with, and revolve sessions around your schedule. Don’t wait to get help - the sooner you contact a trained professional, the sooner you will be on the path to a healthier, happier life.

If you or a loved one are having thoughts of suicide, don’t wait to hear back from a therapist - call an emergency center immediately. You should also keep abreast of medically reviewed information from national centers on brain health.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

Below are commonly asked questions on this topic:

What is the meaning of melancholic depression?

What are signs of melancholia?

Is melancholic depression worse than depression?

Is melancholy the same as depression?

How does a melancholic person behave?

What causes a person to be melancholy?

How do you help a melancholic person?

Is melancholic depression genetic?

What is an example of melancholy?

Who is a melancholic woman?

Frequently Asked Questions:

Is Melancholy The Same As Depression?

Even though melancholy and depression are two similar forms of mental health challenges, they have certain differences. Medically reviewed claims consider melancholy, also called melancholia, to be an advanced form of atypical depression. Depression in itself is a mood disorder that is characterized by sadness or anger. On the other hand, Melancholy is more severe, and it is often termed as Melancholic Depression. They are both behavioral health issues and can be managed through illness treatment techniques, support groups, and suicide prevention procedures. Melancholy has been linked to increasing rates of national suicide, and several grant management processes have been set up to facilitate research into the phenomenon.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

What Are The Symptoms Of Melancholia?

Melancholia is a major depressive disorder known by marked symptoms. From medically reviewed health information, melancholia is regarded as a behavioral health problem and not a separate mental illness. Common symptoms include:

  1. Prolonged feelings of chronic sadness
  2. Lethargy and loss of interest
  3. Anxiety
  4. Irregular eating patterns
  5. Constant fatigue
  6. Thoughts or conversations around suicide
  7. Disruption in sleep patterns
  8. Weight loss
  9. Loss of focus and difficulty in decision making
  10. Suicide attempts

Melancholia contributes significantly to rising national suicide rates. The disorder can be managed through illness treatment procedures, proper general health care, and suicide prevention techniques.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

Is Melancholy A Mental Illness?

Today, the American Psychological Association no longer considers melancholy as a standalone mental illness. Nevertheless, it falls under the general mental health description of major depressive disorders.

Mental illness treatment procedures can cure melancholy. Given that it is a large contributor to national suicide figures, practitioners recommend suicide prevention techniques and disaster preparedness measures in managing the effects of melancholy.

Overwhelming And Persistent Feelings Of Sadness And Hopelessness

Those with melancholic depression often lose the ability to feel pleasure. Confronted by feelings of worthlessness and extreme sadness, these feelings are all-encompassing and feel like they will never end. These symptoms are not brought on by a specific event but rather appear to come out of nowhere.

Complete Loss Of Interest In Activities Once Enjoyed

Even surrounded by positive events, great friends, and activities they once found pleasure in, those going through extreme depression feel no happiness. Events that they once looked forward to are now simply neutral. Even if a day is seemingly ‘good,’ or if they receive wonderful news, it doesn’t alleviate depression.

Thoughts Of Self-harm

While not a symptom in everyone diagnosed with depression, those with more extreme depression may have thoughts of suicide or self-harm, as a brain health problem, melancholic depression can spur threats to human health.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

Disruption In Sleep Patterns

Depression can negatively affect sleep patterns, either leaving the person too sad to get out of bed (leading to excessive sleep) or disrupting sleep entirely (leading to a lack of sleep).

Significant Weight Loss

Loss of interest in most things includes lack of interest in food. Often, medically reviewed studies show that those with melancholic depression will lose their appetite, leading to significant weight loss.

Difficulty Concentrating, Lack Of Energy, And Inability To Make Decisions

Medically reviewed studies consider fatigue a very common symptom of melancholic depression, and even the simplest tasks can seem extremely difficult. It can also be difficult to concentrate on anything or make decisions because there doesn’t seem to be any reason to move forward.

Feelings Of Guilt

Another symptom that differentiates melancholic depression from major depressive disorder is excessive feelings of guilt. These feelings of guilt are not brought on by a certain situation or event but rather linked to past experiences or the worry of doing something wrong in the future.

Symptoms Worse In The Morning

As opposed to major depressive disorder, melancholic depression is characterized by worse symptoms in the mornings. This may lead to difficulty getting out of bed and an inability to face the day ahead. Symptoms may begin to recede slightly as the days go on.

What Causes Melancholic Depression?

The important thing to note in behavioral health is that melancholia specific traumatic event doesn’t cause melancholic depression a traumatic event can trigger depression that may have been lying dormant. Biological factors cause this type of depression; in some cases, it may have been inherited from parents. Those with other mental disorders where psychotic symptoms are present are thought to be more susceptible to this type of depression and elderly patients with dementia.

How Is Melancholic Depression Diagnosed?

As opposed to physical illnesses, diagnosing mental illnesses isn’t as clear-cut of a process. Doctors can’t simply take an x-ray, analyze a blood sample or see any physical problems. Instead, they rely on a handful of questions that will allow them to determine whether the patient is truly depressed or is simply going through a difficult time.

The patient will be required to talk about a typical day - their behaviors, emotions, thoughts, and overall lifestyle. The doctor will try to dig deeper, asking if they have had experienced any traumatic events either recently or in the past that may be contributing to feelings of melancholy. Gathering information on the history of mental illnesses in the family will also be helpful since mental illnesses are often hereditary.

To be diagnosed with melancholic depression, you must be exhibiting at least five of the above symptoms for at least two weeks straight. Before making a diagnosis, a doctor will try to rule out any physical illnesses that may be indirectly causing feelings of depression. Afterward, you will be subjected to proper case management processes.

How Is Melancholic Depression Treated?

Medication - Many patients diagnosed with melancholic depression will be put on antidepressants. This regulates serotonin and dopamine levels in the brain, bringing the mind back to a manageable state. Based on medically reviewed research, antidepressants typically take between 2-4 weeks before they begin to work, and during that time, suicidal thoughts may increase before emotions are regulated. It’s important to stay in contact with your doctor and let them know if you feel as though suicidal thoughts have increased. It is also important to not stop taking antidepressants even when you begin to feel better until your doctor approves and helps you reduce your dosage gradually.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

There are many different types of antidepressants, and it may take a bit of time for a doctor to find the right dosage and medication for you. Proper case management also requires that doctors undertake an in-depth analysis of your behavioral health to recommend the best treatment.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) acknowledges that the way we think and behave affects our everyday life. It pinpoints negative thought patterns in behavioral health and changes them back into more positive thought patterns. A therapist will help you take the steps necessary to restructure the way you think. Since melancholic depression is so severe, CBT is often combined with medication or other types of psychological treatment.

Interpersonal Therapy - Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) focuses on your interpersonal relationships and pinpoints areas that may be exacerbating your symptoms of depression. This type of therapy aims to help patients improve their relationships or alter their expectations of them. IPT also aims to help develop a stronger support network to deal with symptoms of depression more easily and help you manage your behavioral health.

Learning to manage melancholic depression is a long process, but there is hope. If a loved one of yours is going through depression, it’s important to convince them to get the help they need as soon as possible. While it may be a long road to recovery, the combination of medication, psychological treatment, and a strong support system can help alleviate symptoms and help them get on the path to a happier, healthier life. It’s very important to remain a supportive confidante throughout the entire process; people living with depression often feel worthless, and it’s important to remind them that they are not alone. Acknowledging that a problem is the first step, and making that initial appointment is the most difficult part. Afterward, everything else is a step in the right direction.

If you feel as though you are experiencing melancholic depression, seek help from a national center today. The trained therapists at BetterHelp are available 24/7 to discuss your symptoms and provide treatment, and there is no need to leave the comfort of your own home. You can remain anonymous, talk with a professional you feel comfortable with, and revolve sessions around your schedule. Don’t wait to get help - the sooner you contact a trained professional, the sooner you will be on the path to a healthier, happier life.

If you or a loved one are having thoughts of suicide, don’t wait to hear back from a therapist - call an emergency center immediately. You should also keep abreast of medically reviewed information from national centers on brain health.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7, or you can text the word “HOME” to 741741 to reach the Crisis Text Line.

Below are commonly asked questions on this topic:


What is the meaning of melancholic depression?
What are signs of melancholia?
Is melancholic depression worse than depression?
Is melancholy same as depression?
How does a melancholic person behave?
What causes a person to be melancholy?
How do you help a melancholic person?
Is melancholic depression genetic?
What is an example of melancholy?
Who is a melancholic woman?

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