Depression Articles

As one of the mood disorders that millions of people around are facing, depression (also known as clinical depression or major depression disorder) is both learning about and treating. The below articles have been published to both help people that have the condition, as well as those that want to better help someone they care about.

If you or someone you know is dealing with major depression, or you would like to speak to someone about this subject, feel free to contact us to see how one of our counselors can be of assistance.

What Is The Beck Depression Inventory?

The Beck Depression Inventory is a self-report assessment that measures symptoms of depression. It is often used by clinicians and doctors to determine if a patient needs...

What Is Walking Depression?

When someone says the word “depression,” most of us think of a crippling bout of despair that leaves the sufferer unable to get out of bed or accomplish daily tasks. This kind...

13 Books About Depression That Can Help You Understand It Better

There are a lot of reasons that you might want to turn to books about depression. If you have depression, or if someone you love has depression, certain books can help you...

Effects Of Long-Term Depression

Long-term depression can have some serious side effects for anyone, physically, emotionally, socially and economically. Sometimes even with treating depression can last for many...

Is Depression A Disability?

Many people who suffer from depression continually often wonder, “Is depression a disability?” Sometimes depressive disorders can be so intense and life-changing that they...

Psychotic Depression: Symptoms And Treatment

Psychotic depression is much more common than one might think. This is a very serious form of depression that affects about 20 percent of the people diagnosed with clinical...

Tips For Dating Someone With Depression

Loving someone with depression can be tough. Even if you totally understand what’s going on with that person, you may wonder why your love isn’t enough to bring them out of their funk.

Understanding Postnatal Depression

The first thing you need to know about postnatal depression is that you are not a bad person for feeling that way. You are not a bad mother either...

Is Seasonal Affective Disorder A Myth?

Are you a lover of warm weather? Do you despise the cold? Perhaps the thought of winter makes you uneasy and sad? Do you ever wonder why winter makes you feel down? Certainly, the cold weather could play a significant role...

What Is Double Depression?

Double depression is when a person with a Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD), sometimes known as dysthymia, also experiences an episode of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)...

What Is Agitated Depression And How Can It Be Treated?

Suffering from depression is something that can be difficult. Depression impacts people’s lives in different ways. Some people who have depression problems wind up being very...

How Does Behavioral Activation For Depression Work?

Depression is something that impacts the lives of millions of people around the world. It can be very difficult to cope with depression symptoms if you do not have the proper...

What is depression? Depression is a pervasive yet sometimes debilitating mood disorder. According to the US National Library of Medicine 322 million people live with depression worldwide. You might think depression is feeling down. It’s more than feeling sad or blue. Depression can be deadly if left untreated, which is why seeking help is critical. We all experience the hiccups of everyday life struggles. Life isn’t easy, for sure, and we need to manage these challenges. Depression is more than the challenges that life throws at us. It’s a medical condition that can leave people feeling hopeless. It impacts how you think, feel, and function on a day-to-day basis. It can affect how you perform at work, school and engage in social activities. Things that you once enjoyed, depression robs you of leaving you to feel empty and worthless. You feel numb, hopeless, and alone. ‘ Depression is common Depression is a severe mood disorder that affects over 16 million people in The United States. Approximately 10% of adults, up to 8% of teens, and 2% of preteen children have some depressive disorder. Postpartum depression is the most common mental health condition to affect women after childbirth. People who suffer from depression can have extreme difficulties in functioning, and maintaining social relationships. Depression impacts a person’s ability to do day-to-day activities such as eating, sleeping, or going to work. For a person to have a depression diagnosis, they must have symptoms of the condition for at least two weeks. There are many kinds of depression; however, the signs are similar for each type, though there are variations in symptoms. Whether you’re coping with Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Postpartum Depression or Seasonal Affective Disorder, there is help out there. Before you seek treatment, first it’s important to recognize the signs of depression. Signs of depression You might be experiencing depression and not know it. Sometimes the signs are apparent, and other times they’re subtle. Here are some symptoms of depression to look out for, and get help if you notice them. Common symptoms of depression: Feelings of hopelessness. You can’t imagine how your situation will improve. Marked loss of interest in your daily activities. Hobbies you once loved, don’t bring you joy. Losing the ability to feel pleasure Decreased increase in sex Appetite changes. It could be eating too much or not enough. Significant weight loss or weight gain. Sleep issues. Insomnia, or oversleeping Anger or irritability. Even to the point of expressing violence. Low frustration tolerance or a short temper Loss of energy. Feeling sluggish and drained. You might feel like your body is heavy. Self-loathing. Feelings of worthlessness or guilt. Self-critical thoughts Reckless behavior. You engage in avoidant and dangerous behavior such as substance abuse, compulsive spending or reckless driving. Concentration problems. Trouble making decisions, Memory problems Unexplained aches and pains. Stomach pain. A consistent feeling of sadness and low mood Persistent guilt or feelings of worthlessness Moving or speaking slowly Thoughts of suicide or an active plan to end one’s life If you’re experiencing any thoughts of harming yourself, don’t wait to get help. Visit the nearest emergency room or call 911. If you have one or more of the symptoms on the list above for two weeks or more, you could be suffering from depression. Now you know what you’re suffering from, and it’s time to reach out for support. It’s crucial to seek the help of a mental health professional so you can get treatment. Depression is treatable with the right care, and a therapist can support you to get the help you need and start feeling better. You will learn about how depression affects your body and mind, and find ways to cope with your mental health condition. When you know how to deal with depression, it’s possible to live a great life. At risk for suicide You may not know or recognize the behaviors or warning signs that a person is at risk for suicide. Here are some signs to watch out for: Openly talking about harming or killing oneself Expressing feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Being preoccupied with death Engaging in dangerous behavior- driving recklessly, drinking or using drugs Calling loved ones to say goodbye Giving away valuable items a person once loved Uttering phrases such as “People would be better off if I didn’t exist.” Switching from being depressed to calm and even happy. If you notice a loved one displaying any of the above symptoms don’t hesitate to ask them what’s going on or help them get the mental health support they need. By paying attention to their signs, and acting on their behalf, you could save a life. Causes of Depression Biology - People living with depression might have too much of a particular brain chemical. They can also have too little of these specific chemicals, which are called “neurotransmitters." The changes in brain chemicals can actively contribute to a person’s depression. Cognition - Individuals who have persistent negative thinking patterns can develop depression. That’s why Cognitive Behavior Therapy works well for depression. It targets a person’s way of thinking about themselves and the world and helps them to reframe negative thought patterns. Gender - Women are more likely to experience depression than men, but it might have to do with how willing they are to report symptoms. Men often mask their depressive symptoms in self-destructive behavior or may blow off depression due to stress. One of the most common types of depression is postpartum depression (PPD), which occurs after childbirth. Comorbidity - Depression can occur along with certain physical illnesses such as cancer, heart disease, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, and various hormonal disorders. Medications - Some medications have the side effect of bringing on depression. Genetics - You may have a family history of mental illness, including depression. If it’s in your genetics, you are more likely to develop a form of the condition. Some studies indicate that environmental factors and genetics work together to influence depression in a person. Situational problems - Challenging life events can cause depression. A death in the family, divorce, bankruptcy, or losing a job can all contribute to a person developing depression. Common types of depression There are many different kinds of depression, but some of the common types are Major Depressive Disorder, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Postpartum Depression, and Dysthymia. Depending on your signs and symptoms, you’ll be able to find out what type of depression you have after seeing a mental health professional. It’s important to report your exact symptoms to your provider so they can make an accurate diagnosis. Withholding information will prolong your suffering, and make it hard to get help. Be honest about what you’re experiencing so your therapist or doctor can make an accurate diagnosis and get you an excellent treatment plan. Major Depressive Disorder (Clinical Depression) Major Depressive Disorder (Clinical Depression); MDD is a mental illness where a person feels a persistent low mood, which comes along with feelings of low self-worth, and hopelessness. An individual with MDD loses pleasure in daily activities that they once loved, and has a tough time eating, and sleeping. They may sleep too little or too much. They may eat too little or overeat. To have Major Depressive Disorder, they have to have two of the criteria that persists every day for over two weeks. MDD is treatable with therapy and (if needed) medication. Dysthymia or Persistent Depressive Disorder Dysthymia, otherwise known as Persistent Depressive Disorder, characterizes a person who has a depressed mood for at least two years. An individual who has Dysthymia may have a period of mild depression followed by an episode of major depression. People who have Persistent Depressive Disorder can get through the day, but it’s not easy. They’re struggling to cope with their emotions, and it hurts them to face their pain; however, they can manage their symptoms best if they know what they are. The key to getting the right diagnosis is noticing that the symptoms have lasted over two years. Once that determination has been made, it’s clear that the individual has Dysthymia. Postpartum depression Postpartum depression isn’t about being melancholy after having a baby. It’s not the “baby blues,” which is a common phenomenon that many women experience where they are sad directly after giving birth. That goes away with time. Women who experience postpartum depression have feelings of extreme sadness that make it virtually impossible to care for their baby. There’s also a condition called Postpartum anxiety which can go along with PPD. Being a new mother can be difficult. But when you’re experiencing a major depression on top of accepting your role as a mom, it’s painful. Thankfully, there is help. If you’re experiencing PPD, seek help from a mental health professional. You can get better and be a better mom for your baby. But you need to get well first. You might need the support of a therapist and (if need be) the guidance of a psychiatrist who can help with prescribing medication. Bipolar Disorder Bipolar disorder includes depression, but it differs from Major Depressive Disorder. An individual with bipolar disorder has episodes where their moods are extremely low. When they’re feeling down, they meet the criteria for MDD, and what they’re experiencing is called “bipolar depression.” An individual who has bipolar disorder also has highs, which aren’t depression but are called mania. During these highs, they feel euphoric and sometimes irritable. As a part of Bipolar Disorder, depression exists as one of the poles. Depression and isolation A tricky part of depression is that the person experiencing it tends to isolate from their loved ones. If you’re depressed, you may not want to see people that you care about because you’re not feeling well emotionally. That’s why it’s imperative to seek treatment. People who are suffering from depression need to get help. Depression if left untreated can lead to severe consequences, including ending one’s life. There’s hope if the individual receives treatment, and one of the best ways to get help is by seeing a therapist or counselor. Depression in women According to the statistics, women are more likely to display symptoms of depression than men openly. They may experience feelings of guilt, oversleeping, appetite changes, weight gain or weight loss. Depression can impact women during menstruation, or after pregnancy. One in seven women experiences postpartum depression, which is depression that follows childbirth. Depression in men Unlike women, due to societal stigma, men are less likely to acknowledge depression. They might mask feeling depressed by drinking, using drugs or behaving recklessly. They also might complain of being tired, having insomnia or feeling irritable. They’re less likely to admit that they feel guilty or hopeless openly. They’re likely to display a depressed mood as unchecked irritability or anger. Still, depression affects men just like it impacts women. Counseling helps depression One of the most effective types of treatment for depression is counseling. Talking to a therapist about your feelings is invaluable. You’ll be able to express what you’re struggling with and get the treatment you need. Depression can feel incredibly overwhelming, weighing you down, but a counselor is trained to recognize the symptoms and help you work through them. They’ll teach you coping skills, and you’ll learn to manage depression without feeling hopeless. One of the hardest things about getting help when you’re depressed is believing you can get better. When you work with a counselor, they’ll show you that there is hope, and you can heal. Online therapy One form of therapy that can help you with your mental health issues is online counseling. If you’ve come to the realization that you or someone you know is dealing with depression, and you'd like assistance from a licensed therapist; we would love to help. With more than 2,000 licensed counselors interested in and able to help with the treatment, signs, and symptoms of depression, our team of therapists can be of assistance today. Our online platform here at BetterHelp.com is designed to provide the more than 500,000 people that have benefited from our services with the professional help they need online at a time that is convenient for them.
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