Depression Blogs That Provide Support—And Additional Media

Medically reviewed by Laura Angers Maddox, NCC, LPC
Updated April 23, 2024by BetterHelp Editorial Team

If you're experiencing depression, it can be easy to feel like you’re alone. However, depression is a common mental health condition that can affect people from all walks of life. According to the American Psychiatric Association, depression affects 6.7% of the population per year. 

If you live with depression, you might feel like your family and friends don’t understand exactly what you're going through or why your feelings are occurring. Also, you might not know exactly where to turn, which can make a frustrating and emotional situation even harder. However, in recent years, the internet has made it easier to find the support you need while you work on overcoming your mental health conditions. There are numerous depression blogs, books, and podcasts addressing this topic. 

Finding the right one may help you feel understood while also allowing you to discover evidence-based tips you can use as you work toward overcoming depression.

Getty/AnnaStills
Finding the right resources can help you overcome depression
Best depression blogs

Below are seven blogs about depression that provide support and personal experiences of others who live with this disorder. Some are from professional organizations, and others are from people who have experienced this disorder themselves. This may allow you to get professional opinions, read about personal experiences, and receive advice about handling mental health conditions.

NAMI blog

NAMI stands for National Alliance on Mental Illness. This is a nonprofit organization that works to support individuals who are experiencing mental illnesses. While NAMI’s blog isn’t exclusively dedicated to depression, it allows you to filter the blog posts for those that focus on this condition and related topics. 

You can find posts that aim to help you understand what depression is and how to recognize it, along with how to get help. There are also posts about media portraying this condition, tips for improving relationships, and tips for living with a mental health disorder.

You can find the blog at: https://www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog

Wings of Madness

Wings of Madness has been around for more than 25 years, having been founded in 1995. It can serve as a resource for both individuals who are living with depression and those who love someone who is experiencing this disorder. You can find out about the latest treatment options, in addition to learning important tips that you can use as you seek assistance or help a loved one to get the help that they need.

Visit the blog at: https://www.wingofmadness.com/

Blurt

The Blurt Foundation exists to help individuals affected by depression. As soon as you arrive at the website for Blurt, you see the words "Increasing Awareness and Understanding of Depression." The writers work to help educate people with this disorder, so they have the tools they need to forge ahead on the potentially long journey and work toward recovery. You can also find content on how to support loved ones living with this disorder.

Find the blog at: https://www.blurtitout.org/

OC87 Recovery Diaries

OC87 Recovery Diaries offers stories from people who have overcome a variety of mental health conditions, including depression. This may serve as a great way to see that you aren't alone and to find out what has worked for others as they worked to overcome their mental health conditions. 

Read recovery stories at: https://oc87recoverydiaries.org/

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America offers an extensive mental health blog. Although not exclusively dedicated to depression, this blog allows you to filter articles by category. You can also filter blog articles by the intended demographic, including LGBTQ+ individuals, parents, college students, and BIPOC individuals.

This blog can serve as a valuable resource to spread awareness and support those with anxiety and/or depression. 

Check out the ADAA blog at: https://adaa.org/blog

Depression Marathon

This blog was created by a runner and health professional who experiences depression. It has won multiple awards for being one of the best websites about depression out there. Through this blog, the author intends to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and increase awareness of treatments available.

Check it out at: https://depressionmarathon.blogspot.com

Patrice M. Foster (Teenage Depression and Secrets)

If you are a parent of a child or adolescent who is experiencing anxiety and/or depression, this blog may be a valuable resource for you. Written by a registered nurse with more than 30 years of experience, this blog emphasizes teenage depression and stressors that can affect the mental health of adolescents. There are plenty of articles on how to support teenagers experiencing this disorder as well as a comments section where you can hear from other readers. 

Read the blog: https://patricemfoster.com/blog

Helpful books about depression and other mental health conditions

Getty/Vadym Pastukh

If you prefer reading books rather than blog posts, there are some books on depression that may offer you insight into the disorder and help you make progress in your journey. There are books for individuals who are diagnosed with depression, people who are trying to understand the condition, and those trying to support others who are living with it.

The Depression Cure: The 6-Step Program to Beat Depression Without Drugs

In his book, Stephen Ilardi discusses his theory on why we are seeing more depression in the modern age than there was in past generations. His findings led him to identify six areas that he believes we need to focus on more to naturally overcome depression:

  • Brain Food
  • Don't Think, Do
  • Antidepressant Exercise
  • Let There Be Light
  • Get Connected
  • Habits of Healthy Sleep

His program has high success rates and has been found to even help people who haven’t found relief through traditional medication.

The Upward Spiral

Dr. Alex Korb wrote this book to teach others about the neuroscience behind depression that causes people to move on a downward spiral. In this book, Dr. Korb aims to help people rewire their brains and begin an upward spiral of recovery for brain and body.

The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness

This book was written by four mental health professionals who explain why people often become more depressed when they try to think their way out of being depressed. They combine Eastern traditions with cognitive therapy and discuss ways to avoid mental patterns that can lead to despair.

Podcasts about experiencing depression and finding support options

Getty/AnnaStills
Finding the right resources can help you overcome depression

If you’re more interested in podcasts than in articles and books, there are many podcasts on mental health. The following are just a few:

The Hilarious World of Depression

This podcast is hosted by comedian John Moe. Depression is a serious condition that can affect anyone, including comedians. In this podcast, Moe interviews other comedians who have experienced this disorder to provide insight and let people know they are not alone in their experience of depression.

The Brain Warrior's Way

This podcast is hosted by Dr. Daniel Amen and Tana Amen. They work to explain the neuroscience behind things like depression, anxiety, ADHD, memory loss, love, and more. Their podcast also aims to provide practical tips for “building the best brain possible.”

The Hardcore Self-Help Project with Duff the Psych

This podcast is hosted by psychologist Dr. Robert Duff, who aims to use his expertise to help people, but without what he calls “psychobabble." You can find episodes on a variety of topics, including anxiety, mental health, and relationships.

Getting help with mental health conditions

If you are experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition, it may help you to learn more about the disorder and hear encouraging stories from others through depression blogs, books, and podcasts. However, that alone might not be enough to give you the help that you deserve. These media formats may be helpful to use along with traditional forms of treatment, such as medication and therapy. If you don’t feel well enough for traditional in-office therapy, you may benefit from online therapy

With online therapy, you can choose the most comfortable way to communicate with a therapist, whether by phone, live chat, or videoconference. You can also contact your therapist at any time through in-app messaging, and they’ll respond as soon as they can.

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) can be an effective way to work through mental health conditions, and it can be provided online. CBT may help you identify and challenge inaccurate thoughts and then replace them with more positive thoughts. Research has shown that online CBT is just as effective as that done in person. One study published in eClinicalMedicine (part of The Lancet Discovery Science) concluded that online CBT was “at least as effective” as traditional in-person CBT.

Takeaway

If you are experiencing symptoms of depression, you may benefit from reading some of the above depression blogs. If you think you need more support, know that you are not alone. There is help available through therapy, whether in person or online. With online therapy at BetterHelp, you can be matched with a therapist who has experience treating depression and any other concerns you may be facing. BetterHelp also offers financial assistance for therapy to those who qualify. Take the first step toward getting help for depression and living your best life, and reach out to BetterHelp whenever you’re ready.
Depression is treatable, and you're not alone
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