Attacks Answers

How do i stop feeling so anxious, overwhelmed and sad?

Thank you for reaching out, I know it is not easy to ask for help sometimes. The first thing I would do if you want to try and find some mental health services is to see about programs locally that offer therapy for free, or perhaps for a very reduced cost. Some states even have lists of pro bono practitioners that are offering the services you need/want. Websites like this one also provide affordable and accessible mental health services, just ask for promotions or special offers. Now, in the meantime, I am going to help you by giving you tips on how to address some of the issues you just mentioned.  Here are some useful techniques to help you with anxiety, triggers, and even depression:   Physical techniques   These techniques use your five senses or tangible objects — things you can touch — to help you move through distress.   1. Put your hands in water   Focus on the water’s temperature and how it feels on your fingertips, palms, and the backs of your hands. Does it feel the same in each part of your hand?   Use warm water first, then cold. Next, try cold water first, then warm. Does it feel different to switch from cold to warm water versus warm to cold?   2. Pick up or touch items near you   Are the things you touch soft or hard? Heavy or light? Warm or cool? Focus on the texture and color of each item. Challenge yourself to think of specific colors, such as crimson, burgundy, indigo, or turquoise, instead of simply red or blue.   3. Breathe deeply   Slowly inhale, then exhale. If it helps, you can say or think “in” and “out” with each breath. Feel each breath filling your lungs and note how it feels to push it back out.   4. Savor a food or drink   Take small bites or sips of a food or beverage you enjoy, letting yourself fully taste each bite. Think about how it tastes and smells and the flavors that linger on your tongue.   5. Take a short walk   Concentrate on your steps — you can even count them. Notice the rhythm of your footsteps and how it feels to put your foot on the ground and then lift it again.   6. Hold a piece of ice   What does it feel like at first? How long does it take to start melting? How does the sensation change when the ice begins to melt?   7. Savor a scent   Is there a fragrance that appeals to you? This might be a cup of tea, an herb or spice, a favorite soap, or a scented candle. Inhale the fragrance slowly and deeply and try to note its qualities (sweet, spicy, sharp, citrusy, and so on).   8. Move your body   Do a few exercises or stretches. You could try jumping jacks, jumping up and down, jumping rope, jogging in place, or stretching different muscle groups one by one.   Pay attention to how your body feels with each movement and when your hands or feet touch the floor or move through the air. How does the floor feel against your feet and hands? If you jump rope, listen to the sound of the rope in the air and when it hits the ground.   9. Listen to your surroundings   Take a few moments to listen to the noises around you. Do you hear birds? Dogs barking? Machinery or traffic? If you hear people talking, what are they saying? Do you recognize the language? Let the sounds wash over you and remind you where you are.   10. Feel your body   You can do this sitting or standing. Focus on how your body feels from head to toe, noticing each part.   Can you feel your hair on your shoulders or forehead? Glasses on your ears or nose? The weight of your shirt on your shoulders? Do your arms feel loose or stiff at your sides? Can you feel your heartbeat? Is it rapid or steady? Does your stomach feel full, or are you hungry? Are your legs crossed, or are your feet resting on the floor? Is your back straight?   Curl your fingers and wiggle your toes. Are you barefoot or in shoes? How does the floor feel against your feet?   11. Try the 5-4-3-2-1 method   Working backward from 5, use your senses to list things you notice around you. For example, you might start by listing five things you hear, then four things you see, then three things you can touch from where you’re sitting, two things you can smell, and one thing you can taste.   Make an effort to notice the little things you might not always pay attention to, such as the color of the flecks in the carpet or the hum of your computer.     Mental techniques   These grounding exercises use mental distractions to help redirect your thoughts away from distressing feelings and back to the present.   12. Play a memory game   Look at a detailed photograph or picture (like a cityscape or other “busy” scene) for 5 to 10 seconds. Then, turn the photograph face-down and recreate the photograph in your mind, in as much detail as possible. Or, you can mentally list all the things you remember from the picture.   13. Think in categories   Choose one or two broad categories, such as “musical instruments,” “ice cream flavors,” “mammals,” or “baseball teams.” Take a minute or two to mentally list as many things from each category as you can.   14. Use math and numbers   Even if you aren’t a math person, numbers can help center you.   Try:   running through a times table in your head. counting backward from 100 choosing a number and thinking of five ways you could make the number (6 + 11 = 17, 20 – 3 = 17, 8 × 2 + 1 = 17, etc.)   15. Recite something   Think of a poem, song, or book passage you know by heart. Recite it quietly to yourself or in your head. If you say the words aloud, focus on the shape of each word on your lips and in your mouth. If you say the words in your head, visualize each word as you’d see it on a page.   16. Make yourself laugh   Make up a silly joke — the kind you’d find on a candy wrapper or popsicle stick.   You might also make yourself laugh by watching your favorite funny animal video, a clip from a comedian or TV show you enjoy, or anything else you know will make you laugh.   17. Use an anchoring phrase   This might be something like, “I’m Full Name. I’m X years old. I live in City, State. Today is Friday, June 3. It’s 10:04 in the morning. I’m sitting at my desk at work. There’s no one else in the room.”   You can expand on the phrase by adding details until you feel calm, such as, “It’s raining lightly, but I can still see the sun. It’s my break time. I’m thirsty, so I’m going to make a cup of tea.”   18. Visualize a daily task you enjoy or don’t mind doing   If you like doing laundry, for example, think about how you’d put away a finished load.   “The clothes feel warm coming out of the dryer. They’re soft and a little stiff at the same time. They feel light in the basket, even though they spill over the top. I’m spreading them out over the bed so they won’t wrinkle. I’m folding the towels first, shaking them out before folding them into halves, then thirds,” and so on.   19. Describe a common task   Think of an activity you do often or can do very well, such as making coffee, locking up your office, or tuning a guitar. Go through the process step-by-step, as if you’re giving someone else instructions on how to do it.   20. Imagine yourself leaving the painful feelings behind   Picture yourself:   gathering the emotions, balling them up, and putting them into a box walking, swimming, biking, or jogging away from painful feelings Imagine your thoughts as a song or TV show you dislike, changing the channel or turning down the volume — they’re still there, but you don’t have to listen to them.   21. Describe what’s around you   Spend a few minutes taking in your surroundings and noting what you see. Use all five senses to provide as much detail as possible. “This bench is red, but the bench over there is green. It’s warm under my jeans since I’m sitting in the sun. It feels rough, but there aren’t any splinters. The grass is yellow and dry. The air smells like smoke. I hear kids having fun and two dogs barking.”   Soothing techniques   You can use these techniques to comfort yourself in times of emotional distress. These exercises can help promote good feelings that may help the negative feelings fade or seem less overwhelming.   22. Picture the voice or face of someone you love   If you feel upset or distressed, visualize someone positive in your life. Imagine their face or think of what their voice sounds like. Imagine them telling you that the moment is tough, but that you’ll get through it.   23. Practice self-kindness   Repeat kind, compassionate phrases to yourself:   “You’re having a rough time, but you’ll make it through.” “You’re strong, and you can move through this pain.” “You’re trying hard, and you’re doing your best.” Say it, either aloud or in your head, as many times as you need.   24. Sit with your pet   If you’re at home and have a pet, spend a few moments just sitting with them. If they’re of the furry variety, pet them, focusing on how their fur feels. Focus on their markings or unique characteristics. If you have a smaller pet you can hold, concentrate on how they feel in your hand.   Not at home? Think of your favorite things about your pet or how they would comfort you if they were there.   25. List favorites   List three favorite things in several different categories, such as foods, trees, songs, movies, books, places, and so on.   26. Visualize your favorite place   Think of your favorite place, whether it’s the home of a loved one or a foreign country. Use all of your senses to create a mental image. Think of the colors you see, sounds you hear, and sensations you feel on your skin.   Remember the last time you were there. Who were you with, if anyone? What did you do there? How did you feel?   27. Plan an activity   This might be something you do alone or with a friend or loved one. Think of what you’ll do and when. Maybe you’ll go to dinner, take a walk on the beach, see a movie you’ve been looking forward to, or visit a museum.   Focus on the details, such as what you’ll wear, when you’ll go, and how you’ll get there.   28. Touch something comforting   This could be your favorite blanket, a much-loved T-shirt, a smooth stone, a soft carpet, or anything that feels good to touch. Think about how it feels under your fingers or in your hand.   If you have a favorite sweater, scarf, or pair of socks, put them on and spend a moment thinking about the sensation of the fabric on your skin.   29. List positive things   Write or mentally list four or five things in your life that bring you joy, visualizing each of them briefly.   30. Listen to music   Put on your favorite song, but pretend you’re listening to it for the first time. Focus on the melody and lyrics (if there are any). Does the song give you chills or create any other physical sensations? Pay attention to the parts that stand out most to you.   I hope these are helpful, and do not hesitate to ask for more information, have a great day!
(MA, LPC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Is it possible for regular things you do affects a panick attack?

Dear Unique,   Thank you for your message and sharing with me how you've been interacting with yourself, especially on how you've been handling unpleasant feelings and emotions. As you said this has also affected your life significantly. Perhaps by addressing how to handle unpleasant emotions in a healthier manner, we can dive into addressing the issues in your life as well?   Often the experience we've had about anxiety (or any strong emotion such as stress / depression) was so terrible (even physically) that our body sort of become traumatized to it. We naturally become nervous about these unpleasant feelings because we don't like these sensations and experiences. As a result we would do everything we can to avoid / fight these anxious feelings, often using numbing techniques such as using substances or distracting ourselves. Yet only to find that the anxiety gets stronger over time because we have never been able to make peace with it.   Therefore rather than trying to "change" / "fight" / "get rid of" these unpleasant sensations, perhaps the best thing that we can do is to make room for these feelings and even sensations, while staying on track to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment. Floating without judging / blaming ourselves through the anxiety experience, while focusing on making room for anxiety can be helpful.   Here is a short video put up by the author of the book "The Happiness Trap" which does a good job explaining this concept:   Please take some time to watch this and share your thoughts later :) I also highly recommend picking that book as well to supplement this therapy process.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCp1l16GCXI    We as human beings do not like sufferings, therefore often times we would be doing our best to fight it. However just like the analogy of swimming vs floating that we have talked about before, the more we fight it, the faster we sink. While if we can learn to float with these waves, we will realize that we won't sink.   Radical acceptance / Expansion is about accepting of life on life's terms and not resisting what you cannot or choose not to change. Radical Acceptance is about saying yes to life and all that life brings (including all sorts of emotions such as joy, sadness, peace and pain), just as it is without forcing our ways into our lives.   Why do we want to accept life as it is? Because with anything that we do in life that brings us meaning and fulfillment, it always accompany a wide range of emotions, we can't possibly just choose the ones that we like and fight / avoid those that we don't like. Learning to experience all emotions as they are, is a sign that we are living our lives to the fullest.   To do so we must learn to accept (and make room for) any unpleasant sensations, feelings or thoughts that we experience.   We don't want to fight it because the more we fight, the stronger they will come back.   We don't want to avoid it either because the more we avoid, the more we'll be afraid of it.   So the key here is to make room for these sensations, feelings and thoughts, while continue to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment in life.    Learning to "co-exist" with these feelings will naturally reduce the intensity of them.   Floating, is a form of learning to accept these feelings and make room for it.   Let me give you some practical guidelines on what I mean by accepting these feelings and make room for it.   You can look up "expansion technique" under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for more information as well.   How to accept our emotions (and make room for them):   1. OBSERVE. Bring awareness to the feelings in your body.   2. BREATHE. Take a few deep breaths. Breathe into and around them.   3. EXPAND. Make room for these feelings. Create some space for them.   4. ALLOW. Allow them to be there. Make peace with them   Some people find it helpful to silently say to themselves, 'I don't like this feeling, but I have room for it,' or 'It's unpleasant, but I can accept it.'   • When you're feeling an unpleasant emotion, the first step is to take a few slow, deep breaths, and quickly scan your body from head to toe.   • You will probably notice several uncomfortable sensations. Look for the strongest sensation - the one that bothers you the most. For example, it may be a lump in your throat, or a knot in your stomach, or an ache in your chest.   • Focus your attention on that sensation. Observe it curiously, as if you are a friendly scientist, discovering some interesting new phenomenon.   • Observe the sensation carefully. Notice where it starts and where it ends. Learn as much about it as you can. If you had to draw a line around the sensation, what would the outline look like? Is it on the surface of the body, or inside you, or both? How far inside you does it go? Where is the sensation most intense? Where is it weakest? How is it different in the center than around the edges? Is there any pulsation, or vibration within it? Is it light or heavy? Moving or still? What is its temperature?   • Take a few more deep breaths, and let go of the struggle with that sensation. Breathe into it. Imagine your breath flowing in and around it.   • Make room for it. Loosen up around it. Allow it to be there. You don't have to like it or want it. Simply let it be.   • The idea is to observe the sensation - not to think about it. So when your mind starts commenting on what's happening, just say 'Thanks, mind!' and come back to observing.   • You may find this difficult. You may feel a strong urge to fight with it or push it away. If so, just acknowledge this urge, without giving in to it. (Acknowledging is rather like nodding your head in recognition, as if to say 'There you are. I see you.') Once you've acknowledged that urge, bring your attention back to the sensation itself.   • Don't try to get rid of the sensation or alter it. If it changes by itself, that's okay. If it doesn't change, that's okay too. Changing or getting rid of it is not the goal.   • You may need to focus on this sensation for anything from a few seconds to a few minutes, until you completely give up the struggle with it. Be patient. Take as long as you need. You're learning a valuable skill.   • Once you've done this, scan your body again, and see if there's another strong sensation that's bothering you. If so, repeat the procedure with that one.   • You can do this with as many different sensations as you want to. Keep going until you have a sense of no longer struggling with your feelings.   • As you do this exercise one of two things will happen: either your feelings will change - or they won't. It doesn't matter either way. This exercise is not about changing your feelings. It's about accepting them.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

ways of how to cure my mental illness?

I am sorry to hear you are struggling with coping with such difficult things. It sounds like you have a done a great job so far navigating depression and being able to cope in a way that could pull you mostly out of those feelings. Depersonalization is typically brought on by panic and high anxiety, so it makes sense that you would be having that if you are also having panic disorder. Depearsonalization is often best met with mindfulness and awareness. I know that sounds simple but it can be super duper challening. Learning ways to ground yourself and being aware of the triggers you have can help you to keep from struggling as significantly. Here are some things to try to do that. 1) Grounding. Bringing awareness to your body and what is around you. My top recommendation would be progressive muscle relaxation. This is done by focusing on each muscle grouping in your body one by one and flexing those muscles for 5 seconds and then relaxing for 5 seconds. Continue doing this for 3 times per grouping starting at the top of your body working your way down. By doing this you will bring your focus into your body which can help alleviate those symptoms.  2) Triggers. Try keeping a log or a journal after or during an episode of depersonalization. Bringing awareness to the things that trigger or cause the anixety that leds to the depersonalization can help you start utilizng other coping skills sooner in effort to avoid it getting to that point. Sometimes triggers are not as obvious so I recommend logging where are you, what are you doing, who are you with, what time of day is it, and what thoughts and feelings you have surrounding those times.  I am not sure what skills you have in terms of coping, but there are plenty available. It would be wise to get a therapist who can help you to learn some so that once you recognize your triggers you can start utilizing them sooner than later and hopefully prevent an episode of depersonalization. Things like deep breathing, music, art and utilizing support systems can be a good place to start when it comes to coping.  I wish you the best as you navigate this, I know how scary and confusing this must be, but you are not alone!
(MS, LMHC, RPT)
Answered on 01/20/2022

How can I cope with this?

I am so sorry to hear that you are struggling with nightmares when thinking about your father and it sounds like you had a traumatic relationship with him.  It will be important to recognize when your feelings have a purpose versus when they do not.  We of course want positive feelings in our lives, but sometimes negative feelings are there for a reason and we need to live out that purpose in order for it to get better.  If we do not live out the purpose of our feelings, it likely leads us to feel worse.  For example, something as simple as having anxiety about needing to get the chores done has the purpose of getting us motivated to get the chores done.  Therefore, if we do not live out that purpose and the chores remain undone, that can lead to more bad feelings, such as, “I am lazy” or “I am worthless.”  This is a simple example of how if we do not pay attention to our feelings and live out the purpose, they can become much, much worse.  So, I would encourage you to try and separate out the thoughts that have a purpose from the thoughts that do not have a purpose and are more intrusive.    For the ones that do have a purpose, it can be helpful to allow yourself to think through the anxious thoughts because anxiety has a nasty way of going to the worst possible scenario.  If you can wrap your head around that scenario, it can make it less scary.  For example, I had a client that was very anxious daily about being single for the rest of his life.  Thinking to that extreme is clearly anxiety and it just lingers there.  So, then he was able to think through that scenario and come up with a plan to make it less scary.  He then came up with that if he really is going to be single the rest of his life, which is highly unlikely, he is going to work towards being able to live close to the ocean since that is a dream of his.  Thinking about it now does not make him as scared because he recognizes he could be happy with that. So, try to think through specific things you are anxious about that have a purpose and make sure you have a specific plan on how to improve those things. For example, having a specific plan for how to address specific triggers you have that trigger the faster breathing.      Intrusive thoughts tend to not have a purpose and it can be really helpful to try and overpower those before they are accepted as truths.   We can have power over our thoughts and I want to help you not engage in these thoughts that make you so upset.  The easiest example of this that I can think of is if I went skydiving.  If I went skydiving I would have some obvious, rational, anxious thoughts.  If I really have a desire to skydive though I will need to not engage in those thoughts.  I might have thoughts such as, "My parachute could fail, I will hit the ground, I am going to pass out, etc."  However, since I really want to follow through with skydiving, I would want to stop those thoughts in their tracks with, "I know this is going to be really fun, they inspect the parachutes ahead of time, people hardly ever get hurt doing this, etc."  By focusing on those thoughts and not engaging in the others, I would be able to follow through with skydiving. Try to sort through any thoughts that get you down about yourself and that you can’t handle all of this and try to overpower those.  These types of thoughts are very common when dealing with this kind of trauma and emotional abuse.      As you do those processes it can be helpful to validate yourself as someone of worth and that has been able to get through challenges in your past.  Something that could be helpful for you is what I like to call centering thoughts.  These are thoughts that are predetermined and unique to you for you to turn to in low moments.  They need to be powerful enough to bring you back to your center.  It is important that these thoughts are accessible for you to look at when you need to.  Some clients prefer to read and re-read them and some prefer to write and re-write them until they feel better.  I have clients that write these somewhere they will see daily such as their bathroom mirror or phone background, while others simply have them in their phone to pull out when they need to.  An example of a centering thought would be from a client I had that related to nautical themed things and her thought was, "I will not let this sink me."  Another example is from an Olympic skier that actually had difficulties with negative thinking getting in the way of her performance so she went to therapy.  She mentioned that she learned about centering thoughts to battle all of the people telling her she “should be” or “should do.”  To battle those thoughts, she uses the simple centering thought of, “I am.”  She can then remind herself that she is good enough, that she is confident, and that she does want to still compete, which really affirms her own feelings and not others.  Hopefully you can come up with something that helps validate your worth and abilities to move forward.       I hope that some of this is helpful and that you can apply it to your circumstances.  I hope that you can lean on some family and/or friends through this.  Doing so can help take weight off of your shoulders as well as hopefully get some valuable advice from them. Try to take the healing one day at a time and adding one positive thing back into your life each day. I wish you all the best and I hope that you are staying safe.
(MA, LPC, NCC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

how to move on from negative thoughts cause by panic attacks and anixety disorder,

  Hello Houssem,   Thank you for reaching out on The BetterHelp Platform with your question: How to move on from negative thoughts cause by panic attacks and anxiety disorder? I am glad you reached out with what you are going through in your life at the moment.  I can see that your anxiety symptoms are seriously interfering with your life.   I will share some information about your anxiety symptoms and how it can lead to a cycle of negative thinking that is hard to stop.   I will share also re some tools you can try yourself.  I would encourage you to reach out for support and guidance with learning how to manage your negative thought patterns.  Proven Techniques to Learn How to Deal with Anxiety How to Know if You Have Anxiety Anxiety is diagnosed by a trained professional, a psychologist or psychiatrist, but there are specific symptoms shared by most people with anxiety. Anxiety causes symptoms that are both mental and physical. These symptoms vary from person to person, and it is best to see a professional for diagnosis, but it never hurts to learn all you can in the meantime. Mental symptoms include excessive worry, apprehensive thoughts that disrupt your daily life, feelings of dread and fear that do not have a logical explanation, and exaggerated thoughts that make it difficult to focus and be productive. Physical symptoms include excessive sweating, blotchy skin, hives or rashes, racing heart, vomiting, headache, hyperventilation, numbness in the extremities, shortness of breath, weakness, dizziness and in some cases chest pain and heart palpitations. For people with anxiety, the apprehension of "what if" leads to behaviors that are disruptive to their life. The distraction caused by anxious thoughts is only one piece of the puzzle. When anxiety goes unchecked, the anxious thoughts and behaviors begin to take their toll physically. Techniques for Dealing with Anxiety Dealing with anxiety can seem overwhelming and for some, dealing means avoiding situations that trigger anxious feelings and behaviors. There are many ways people try to deal with anxiety, and most of them hurt rather than help. It is important to understand that anxiety cannot be "cured", but it does not have to take over your life. You can learn to deal with anxiety in a constructive way that will help you control your reactions and behavior, when you are faced with anxiety. Anxiety begins with anxious thoughts; these thoughts can take on a life of their own. Social anxiety and panic attacks can accompany general anxiety or GAD. The techniques below will also help you deal with GAD and social anxiety too. When you notice anxiety beginning to take hold, use these proven techniques to learn how to deal with it in a constructive way: Control anxiety with thought recognition and behavioral modification Overcome social anxiety by challenging your negative thoughts Calm anxiety by practicing mindfulness and meditation Treat panic attacks with breathing exercises and physical exercise Talk to someone about your anxiety. Therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists understand, and they can help relieve anxiety by listening and providing more personalized techniques Reduce anxiety with diet and exercise Learn to Control Anxiety Dealing with anxiety requires some understanding and a few proven tools to help you deal with it. Learning to control anxiety isn't about stopping anxiety or fighting anxiety, it is all about regulating your reactions and modifying your behaviors. You can learn to control your reactions to anxiety and modify your behaviors if you learn to identify the situations that trigger anxiety and learn to recognize anxious thoughts when they arise. Once you know your anxiety triggers, you can actively modify your behavior. The following proven techniques will help you identify your triggers, modify your behavior, and work to control your anxiety before it controls you. Recognize Rumination ·          Rumination is the act of overthinking and mulling over thoughts that worry you and distract you from the present. During rumination, you will notice that your thoughts may be exaggerated and your decision making and problem solving is diminished. Once you recognize you are ruminating, you will be able to calm yourself by accepting the rumination as a symptom of anxiety and not something you need to act on. Recognize distortions in thought Once you recognize rumination, you will learn to recognize distortions in those ruminating thoughts. Thoughts that are stressful and worrisome cannot be ignored, that will just make things worse. If you learn to recognize these distorted thoughts, you will have the ability to let them pass without acting on them. These feelings and thoughts are real because they trigger anxiety, but you can learn to let them pass without acting once you recognize them for what they are. Sometimes these techniques are not enough to help you control your anxiety and admitting that is ok; as a matter of fact, admitting you cannot control everything is another technique for controlling anxiety! Everyone is different, so don't be harsh or judgmental with yourself. A professional therapist can help you use these techniques and others to help you control your anxiety. Overcoming Social Anxiety Social anxiety is characterized by an intense fear of social situations. For some, it may only surface during certain situations such as public speaking or attending a party; for others, it disrupts everyday living. Social anxiety has many facets and only a professional can diagnose this condition, but if you have symptoms of social anxiety, working on what you can is a step in the right direction. The most important thing to remember about social anxiety is that you are not alone, many people experience social anxiety and many of them have very public careers. Do not judge yourself for feeling the way you do, just accept that you cannot change everything and work on what you can change. The best way to change what you can is diffuse your negative thoughts and feelings. Examples of how to diffuse negative thoughts: When you think, others are thinking bad things about you, diffuse this thought by asking yourself "Why would this person or people think bad about me?" and/or "They don't even know me, they can't possibly be thinking bad things about me," or "They have enough going on in their lives, too much to be overly concerned with thinking critically about me." If you are thinking, "I know I am going to embarrass myself if I go to that party, I always embarrass myself." Diffuse this thought by asking yourself why you believe you will embarrass yourself, "always" is a strong word, are you sure you "always" embarrass yourself? Diffusing negative thoughts by questioning the reasoning behind the thought works quite well for easing social anxiety. Once you begin to question yourself and ask why you think or feel the way you do, you are forced to rationalize your thoughts and feelings. Rationalizing and anxiety don't mix, and in time as you practice, you will be able to classify your thoughts as rational or not and then decide about action based on that rather than the thoughts themselves. Calming Anxiety with Mindfulness and Meditation Mindfulness and meditation are both calming techniques that work by relaxing the mind and allowing it to release stress. Anxiety will not disappear because you practice mindfulness and meditation, but it will lessen, and you will gain a sense of calm that is hard to achieve without these techniques. Mindfulness and regular meditation can provide stability when anxiety threatens to take over. Mindfulness is the act of being present, in the moment, and aware of what is around you. Mindfulness is awesome in its simplicity, and with practice you will be able to calm your racing thoughts by tuning out and tuning in to something grounding in the moment. There are many free and helpful apps available to help you begin a mindfulness practice. Mindfulness should be cultivated daily to strengthen it as a skill, not just when anxiety is present. Note the things in your environment and really let them absorb you as you describe each one to yourself mentally. Meditation takes many forms, and it does not matter which one you choose. Meditation teaches us to be in control of our breathing and to clear our thoughts. Meditation helps put us in touch with our autonomic nervous system, and this has the potential to put us in control of lowering anxiety. Treating Panic Attacks with Exercise Panic attacks are sudden intense episodes of anxiety and fear that trigger physical reactions when there is no obvious danger or cause. Panic attacks can be disabling and completely disruptive to daily activity. Those who suffer from panic attacks know that the stress experienced earlier in the week can trigger a panic attack days later. If you think you suffer from panic attacks, it is important that you seek professional help for them, but it never hurts to do what you can to ease your symptoms. Exercise and breathing exercises can and do help those who suffer from panic attacks. Regular exercise can reduce the amount of adrenaline in your system because the body will work to regulate the adrenaline during and after exercise. Exercise changes the body's chemistry, and these chemical changes can lessen the occurrence and severity of panic attacks. Breathing exercises during a panic attack can lessen the duration of the attack itself. Breathing exercises can be as simple as counting the number of breaths you are taking, to focusing on regulating your breathing. Many times, panic attacks include hyperventilation or shortness of breath, so practicing breathing exercises will make it easier for you to focus on these exercises during an attack. Practice inhaling deeply for several seconds, holding your breath for a few seconds, and then taking several seconds longer than you inhaled to release that breath. This helps signal your body that your sympathetic nervous system can relax and that you aren't in danger. Although breathing exercises and physical exercise can and do help to treat panic attacks, you should still seek a professional diagnosis. Therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists can provide more diverse forms of treatment for panic attacks including support during or after an episode. Reducing Anxiety with Diet and Exercise If you suffer from anxiety, your diet and exercise patterns can affect the severity of your anxiety. What we eat has a huge impact on how our body and mind reacts to stress. Without the proper nutrition, we are vulnerable to the effects of anxiety in ways we don't even realize. The chemistry of our body changes depending on the food we eat, and this chemistry has a lot to do with anxiety. Sugar and caffeine should be avoided as both are stimulants. Stimulants can irritate the nervous system and place it on alert, making you more likely to experience anxiety or panic. Alcohol is a commonly used self-medication for anxiety, but with poor results. Alcohol should be avoided. Exercise releases endorphins and endorphins make everything seem brighter and better. The chemical changes that take place during and immediately after exercise work wonders for stress and anxiety. Stress levels lower the more you exercise and regular exercise eases and reduces anxiety because the mind and body are focused on the activity and the endorphins will make sure you feel good about yourself. Talk to Someone These tips and techniques are meant to help you deal with anxiety, but nothing beats the help of a therapist or other mental health professional. Talking to someone who is a knowledgeable, trained professional, is one of the best ways to deal with anxiety. A therapist can provide insight, and help you develop a strategy for dealing with your anxiety. Talking to someone can ease your fears, keep you positive, and provide the support you need to continue moving forward. There is hope.  Recovery is possible and there is help available for you.   I wish you much luck with your next step in managing your symptoms of anxiety.   In Kindness, Gaynor 
(MA, LCSW)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Could I have ptsd

Good afternoon, Thank you for writing this information.    I am so sorry to hear that this happened to you, as it sounds like even after 5 years there are still lingering issues related to past symptoms of anxiety and trauma.  When we look at anxiety, it goes just beyond simple worry.  This worry can manifest in the following ways and symptoms: 1. *Taken from GAD-7: Feeling nervous, anxious, or on edge Not being able to stop or control worrying Worrying too much about different things Trouble relaxing Being so restless that it is hard to sit still Becoming easily annoyed or irritable Feeling afraid, as if something awful might happen   These symptoms should be reviewed as part of a bothersome problem list over the past two weeks.  We then rank each one according to: Not at all, several days, more than half the days, nearly every day.   This gives us a score and a guiding tool to look further at anxiety when the score is significant.   Now, combine that on top of potential PTSD or severe trauma symptoms.  Those could stem from witnessing, experiencing past physical, sexual or emotional abuse.    Those symptoms that could linger or increase after the abuse could include:  hypervigilance nightmares paranoia startles easily flashbacks reminders of the trauma intrusive thoughts self-destructive behavior emotional detachment and ANXIETY.   It is not uncommon for victims of sexual assault to feel helpless, like their attacker is going to find them and do it again.   This requires specialized counseling from a trauma standpoint to understand both triggers that may "set off" the trauma, along with understanding and working with the symptoms as well.  Some therapies allow you to recount what happened and work through the issues, such as exposure therapy, and others, such as CPT, or Cognitive Processing Therapy, do not.   I'm not sure where the schizophrenia piece comes into play.  This diagnosis is one that often but not always manifests in as a serious mental disorder where people will schism in their mind - that is interpret reality abnormally.   This is different from disassociation of PTSD and different from worry that is anxiety.  Some individuals with PTSD can have hallucinations, but they are trauma related.  In schizophrenia, the hallucinations are bizzare and abnormal.  They also have extremely disorder thinking and behaviors that impair their daily life.  Furthermore, you can also have delusions, disordered speech, disorganized or abnormal motor behavior and what are called "negative symptoms" - lack of ability to funcion or neglecting hygiene or lack of emotion (flat affect).  These symptoms too differ from PTSD and anxiety as well.  While I am not providing a diagnosis, it is highly unlikely that someone would have schizophrenia later in life and not know it.   More common are the hallucinations, the paranoia that people are out to get you or hurt you - that paranoia differs from paranoia or delusions in individuals with schizophrenia.   There are trauma therapists and therapists that specialize in treating both PTSD and anxiety with CBT, CPT, EMDR and exposure therapy.   Those would be the best type of therapists to seek out.  You could mention about schizophrenia when you start to see a therapist.  They can complete schizophrenic screening tools for you if you still wonder about that aspect of mental health.  Best of luck to you.      
(LISW, LCSW)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Will I ever be able to overcome social anxiety or is medication unavoidable ?

hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.hello and thank you for your question. there are different coping skills and grounding techniques you can implement to try to reduce your anxiety. another thing is ensuring you are implementing self care on a weekly basis or monthly basis by doing things you enjoy like reading, drawing, hiking, exercising, getting massages, etc. Grounding techniques you can google and find HUNDREDS. many grounding techniques use our senses like smelling, touching, seeing. There are activities of counting backwards by 8 starting from 100, counting how many tiles you see on the floor or seeing, identifyng how many blue objects you can find in the room, identifying an object that starts with each letter of the alphabet, etc. also trying to separate yourself like using the restroom and splashing cold water on your face and doing guided meditation. If you feel the anxiety is to the point that it interferes with your day to day life, i recommend seeing a primary care doctor or psychiatrist to assist in possible medication management. good luck to you.
Answered on 01/20/2022

How to change my anxiety trigger

Dear iMacki,   Thank you for your message and sharing with me how you've been interacting with yourself, especially on how you've been handling unpleasant feelings and emotions. As you said this has also affected your life significantly. Perhaps by addressing how to handle unpleasant emotions in a healthier manner, we can dive into addressing the issues in your life as well?   Often the experience we've had about anxiety (or any strong emotion such as stress / depression) was so terrible (even physically) that our body sort of become traumatized to it. We naturally become nervous about these unpleasant feelings because we don't like these sensations and experiences. As a result we would do everything we can to avoid / fight these anxious feelings, often using numbing techniques such as using substances or distracting ourselves. Yet only to find that the anxiety gets stronger over time because we have never been able to make peace with it.   Therefore rather than trying to "change" / "fight" / "get rid of" these unpleasant sensations, perhaps the best thing that we can do is to make room for these feelings and even sensations, while staying on track to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment. Floating without judging / blaming ourselves through the anxiety experience, while focusing on making room for anxiety can be helpful.   Here is a short video put up by the author of the book "The Happiness Trap" which does a good job explaining this concept:   Please take some time to watch this and share your thoughts later :) I also highly recommend picking that book as well to supplement this therapy process.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCp1l16GCXI    We as human beings do not like sufferings, therefore often times we would be doing our best to fight it. However just like the analogy of swimming vs floating that we have talked about before, the more we fight it, the faster we sink. While if we can learn to float with these waves, we will realize that we won't sink.   Radical acceptance / Expansion is about accepting of life on life's terms and not resisting what you cannot or choose not to change. Radical Acceptance is about saying yes to life and all that life brings (including all sorts of emotions such as joy, sadness, peace and pain), just as it is without forcing our ways into our lives.   Why do we want to accept life as it is? Because with anything that we do in life that brings us meaning and fulfillment, it always accompany a wide range of emotions, we can't possibly just choose the ones that we like and fight / avoid those that we don't like. Learning to experience all emotions as they are, is a sign that we are living our lives to the fullest.   To do so we must learn to accept (and make room for) any unpleasant sensations, feelings or thoughts that we experience.   We don't want to fight it because the more we fight, the stronger they will come back.   We don't want to avoid it either because the more we avoid, the more we'll be afraid of it.   So the key here is to make room for these sensations, feelings and thoughts, while continue to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment in life.    Learning to "co-exist" with these feelings will naturally reduce the intensity of them.   Floating, is a form of learning to accept these feelings and make room for it.   Let me give you some practical guidelines on what I mean by accepting these feelings and make room for it.   You can look up "expansion technique" under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for more information as well.   How to accept our emotions (and make room for them):   1. OBSERVE. Bring awareness to the feelings in your body.   2. BREATHE. Take a few deep breaths. Breathe into and around them.   3. EXPAND. Make room for these feelings. Create some space for them.   4. ALLOW. Allow them to be there. Make peace with them   Some people find it helpful to silently say to themselves, 'I don't like this feeling, but I have room for it,' or 'It's unpleasant, but I can accept it.'   • When you're feeling an unpleasant emotion, the first step is to take a few slow, deep breaths, and quickly scan your body from head to toe.   • You will probably notice several uncomfortable sensations. Look for the strongest sensation - the one that bothers you the most. For example, it may be a lump in your throat, or a knot in your stomach, or an ache in your chest.   • Focus your attention on that sensation. Observe it curiously, as if you are a friendly scientist, discovering some interesting new phenomenon.   • Observe the sensation carefully. Notice where it starts and where it ends. Learn as much about it as you can. If you had to draw a line around the sensation, what would the outline look like? Is it on the surface of the body, or inside you, or both? How far inside you does it go? Where is the sensation most intense? Where is it weakest? How is it different in the center than around the edges? Is there any pulsation, or vibration within it? Is it light or heavy? Moving or still? What is its temperature?   • Take a few more deep breaths, and let go of the struggle with that sensation. Breathe into it. Imagine your breath flowing in and around it.   • Make room for it. Loosen up around it. Allow it to be there. You don't have to like it or want it. Simply let it be.   • The idea is to observe the sensation - not to think about it. So when your mind starts commenting on what's happening, just say 'Thanks, mind!' and come back to observing.   • You may find this difficult. You may feel a strong urge to fight with it or push it away. If so, just acknowledge this urge, without giving in to it. (Acknowledging is rather like nodding your head in recognition, as if to say 'There you are. I see you.') Once you've acknowledged that urge, bring your attention back to the sensation itself.   • Don't try to get rid of the sensation or alter it. If it changes by itself, that's okay. If it doesn't change, that's okay too. Changing or getting rid of it is not the goal.   • You may need to focus on this sensation for anything from a few seconds to a few minutes, until you completely give up the struggle with it. Be patient. Take as long as you need. You're learning a valuable skill.   • Once you've done this, scan your body again, and see if there's another strong sensation that's bothering you. If so, repeat the procedure with that one.   • You can do this with as many different sensations as you want to. Keep going until you have a sense of no longer struggling with your feelings.   • As you do this exercise one of two things will happen: either your feelings will change - or they won't. It doesn't matter either way. This exercise is not about changing your feelings. It's about accepting them.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Why do I feel anxiety daily?

Hi Yin,  Thank you so much for reaching out of BetterHelp.  I appreciate the information you shared with me.  It must be very distressing to manage anxiety levels while you are in school.  Going to school, studying a high demand field, and dealing with the pandemic are tough.  I applaud you for being motivated to better yourself.  Sometimes, it can the most difficult step to take.  I hope the suggestions I share with you will help you manage your anxiety. -Exercise.  Try to do at least 30 mintues of cardiovascular exercise 3 to 4 times per week.  It can help you to regulate mood and increase oxygen to your brain. -5 senses.  Take notice of your environment.  What do you smell, hear, taste, touch, and see?  For example, while going on a walk try to find 5 items that are the color blue.  This exercise is meant assist in orienting you to the present.  Anxiety tends to either take the mind back the past or worry about the future. -Triple P. Permanent.  The way you feel right now will not be permanent.  Feelings diminish in intensity over time.  You may not feel the same way you did last week or a month ago.  Give yourself a chance to feel the feelings and ride through the waves of distress.   This is temporary. Pervasive.  There can be good/helpful forms of anxiety.  Not all forms of anxiety are bad.  It can help to motivate us to go to school, get out bed in the morning, and/or do a presentation.  Try to differentiate the differences between good stress (also known as eustress) and bad stress.  Some examples of bad stress are getting in to a car accident, coming home to a consistently stressful environment, and/or being a victim of a crime.  Remember, the concept of all or nothing does not apply to anxiety.  It is much more nuanced. Personalization.  Some stressors might not even be related to you.  For example, if server is rude to you at a restaurant it might not have anything to do with you.  Perhaps, the server recently heard bad news or was just reprimanded by their boss.  These incidents can cause a change in mood for most people.  We are all human an are not immune to the evironment around us. -Self care.  Do activities that you find soothing and relaxing.  Maybe you can get back to a hobby that you have not done for awhile.  Find ways to pamper yourself. Please take your time to custimize and try out the suggestions above.  See which ones you respond to the most.  Be patient with yourself and treat yourself with some compassion.  You deserve a chance to create your happy life. You do have a choice a to select me as your counselor.  I would be more than happy to provide you with more anxiety managment tools.  And, it would be a honor to assist you through your journey.  I look forward to hearing from you soon. Best,  Jeannie Meyers, LCSW
(LCSW, 74817)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Is anxiety cureable

Hello Unain,   Thank you for reaching out on The BetterHelp Platform with your question: Is anxiety curable? I am so glad you reached out for some guidance about your anxiety.   There isn't a cure for anxiety as such but there are many effective and evidence based therapies to help you manage and cope better with your symptoms and the causes of your stress and anxiety.   I see you have identified your source of anxiety as LGB related matters and how this physically increases your stress and anxiety.      I will share some information about anxiety related matters and how with some professional mental health support you can make some positive changes in your life to manage these uncomfortable issues.   I would recommend you consider talking with your medical provider and also reaching out for professional support and guidance from a mental health counselor.  Someone who can teach you some effective coping skills.  Talk with someone supportive and non judgemental about your issues relating to LGB matters too.       Managing And Learning How To Deal With Anxiety     Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorders in the United States. Approximately 40 million adults experience anxiety in the U.S. alone.   three theories as the major reasons for the rise in anxiety disorders in America:   Poor community ties and poor social skills; Individuals being more self-centered and focused on money, fame and image; and High expectations from oneself, evidently leading to anxiety disorders and depression.   Shocking, but true, the more we advance technologically, the more we tend to degrade socially. Humans are social beings, and when the social side of our development is stunted by the overuse of technology, it causes less social interaction and overindulgence. This causes all kinds of disorders to develop in the human psyche.   However, thanks to research and studies, people are becoming more aware of their situations and are once again leaning on forms of natural treatments. When treated naturally, mental disorders and anxiety treatments have little to no side effects and lead to faster healing and recovery.   Below is a list of 25 proven natural strategies that will help you manage your anxiety symptoms:   Meditation: The very first thing you do when you wake up sets the tone for your entire day. Often, the first things we do when we wake up are to check our emails on our phone/laptop or switch on the TV. By doing this, we are causing external stimuli to dictate our behavior. This act initiates a certain level of anxiety to develop in our psyche at the very beginning of the day.      In order to break this cycle of anxiety and stress, start your day with meditation. Meditation helps you generate a sense of positivity and calmness as you prepare mentally for the day's challenges.   Waking up Early: Morning hours are very stressful for a lot of people. A lot of multitasking happens at this hour, where people are trying to juggle getting ready for work, sending their children to school and preparing breakfast. As mentioned earlier, setting the right tone at the very beginning of the day greatly helps reduce anxiety. Trying to get a lot of things done at the last minute in the morning can be extremely stressful and cause a lot of anxiety.   To prevent this from happening, prepare for the next day by getting things ready the previous night. Small things, like selecting your clothes for the next day or preparing lunch and breakfast menu options, can greatly help reduce your anxiety.   Waking up early will give you some time for yourself and will help you prepare for the day. Enjoying some peace and quiet will greatly help you fight off anxiety.   Praying: Apart from meditating, spending a few minutes in prayer is a great way to combat anxiety, according to studies. Negative thoughts generate a lot of stress, which, in turn, cause a lot of anxiety. The fear and worry leading up to an event, like an exam, meeting or presentation, can cause you to feel anxious. Prayer helps dispel all of these negative thoughts and creates a sense of optimism. Mentally surrendering your thoughts and actions gives you the confidence and assurance that your day will go well; thus, this causes your anxieties to decrease.     Eating Breakfast: It is not uncommon for people to forego breakfast as they rush out the door in the morning. People who experience anxiety disorders often skip breakfast.  Low levels of the food compound choline lead to increased levels of anxiety in individuals. In order to overcome this deficiency, he recommends eating eggs, which are a source of choline.     Music: Listening to music is a great way to calm yourself and reduce anxiety. Listening to music of your choice not only relaxes you but also helps you remove your focus from the source of anxiety. According to a Utah Pain Research Center study, music therapy not only helped people cope with their troubles but also greatly helped to reduce their body pain.   Aromatherapy: Smelling certain scents has a calming effect on our bodies. Lavender, has been found to reduce anxiety. Also, lighting scented candles or placing sweet smelling lavender flowers in your house can be a great way to reduce anxiety and promote calmness.   Socializing: Spending time with people whom you love and whose company you enjoy has been found to reduce anxiety.  Going out for coffee, eating dinner together, scheduling a Skype call or visiting an old friend are great ways to reduce anxiety according to this This study also states that maintaining meaningful relationships is essential to cognitive sharpness and brain development.   People who maintain relationships and engage in social conversation were found to be sharper and tended to remain healthy and happier. Engaging in social conversation tends to greatly reduce stress levels, causing recovery from anxiety and depression.   Laughter Therapy:  I have not seen anyone dying of laughter, but I know millions who are dying because they are not laughing. Laughter, they say, is the best medicine. Enjoying a good laugh with your friends, children and relatives can be very therapeutic.   Laughter has been associated with many health benefits and is known to be an effective psychiatric medicine as it reduces stress hormones, establishes feelings of well-being, lowers blood pressure, brings about pain relief and improves cardiac health. Watching comedic movies or TV shows or being part of a laughter therapy group are other ways to add humor to your day. Studies state that even forcing yourself to smile can contribute to a sense of well-being.   Avoiding Caffeine: Reducing your caffeine intake per day can greatly help reduce symptoms of anxiety, as caffeine  is a psychoactive drug that is intricately linked with mental disorders. Caffeine is not just present in coffee but in sodas, chocolate and tea. So, watch what you are eating and drinking.   Reframe your Thinking: Negative thinking.  Constantly worrying about things happening or not happening causes an individual to experience major stress. The only remedy to this problem is to alter your thought pattern. Thoughts greatly affect one's behavior. Changing your thought process from negative to positive is a proven way to reduce anxiety. Changing the negative thought immediately as soon as it pops into your mind is essential in reducing anxiety.   Here are some examples of rephrasing your thinking:   If a student thinks, "I will fail my exam" and they are engrossed in worry, they could try to rephrase it to the following: "I will not fail my exam because I have studied and have prepared well. The exam is going to be easy and I am going to pass with flying colors." If someone thinks, "Something is going to happen to me, and I am going to die," they could rephrase it with, "Today is a beautiful day. I am blessed to be alive and surrounded by family and friends. Nothing bad is going to happen today. Something good is in store for me."     Avoid over scheduling: Having too many things to do can also cause anxious thoughts and behavior. Taking responsibility for a lot of things can make you feel tired and anxious. If you already have a lot on your plate, making extra commitments can lead you to feel overwhelmed, cranky and jittery. The pressure to get everything right can lead to stressful feelings and affect your mental health greatly.  In order to combat over scheduling, try prioritizing your schedule. If certain work can be delegated, then don't be afraid to ask for help. It's OK that you're not a superhuman. You can't do it all, all of the time.   Breathing: Taking deep breaths to calm yourself is a great way to decrease anxious thoughts. Taking a deep breath not only calms you down but gives you time to reason and challenge a negative thought. Taking a deep breath slows down your heartbeat, powers up your system mentally and physically so you can make an informed decision.   Exercise: Exercising for 30 minutes per day significantly helps to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. According to studies, when we exercise, our bodies produce increased quantities of norepinephrine, a chemical that moderates the brain's response to stress. Regular exercise has also been associated with increased feelings of happiness.   Visualization: Visualization is a great relaxing technique. Thoughts greatly influence your actions; therefore, it is important that your thoughts are positive and optimistic. The technique of visualization teaches you to use your imagination to reframe your thoughts into relaxing and calming scenarios. Imagining yourself in a safe and serene place greatly helps reduce your level of anxiety. For example, when you are having anxious thoughts, replace them with visions of being on a beach, with the warm sand trickling down your feet, water splashing around you and the tropical air blowing across your face.   Yoga: Practicing yoga is a relaxing way to combat anxious thoughts and behavior. Yoga is a mind-body practice that uses a combination of exercises like breathing exercises, physical body poses and relaxation techniques. These combinations of mind and body techniques ensure a complete physical and mental workout, thus, greatly reducing stress, blood pressure and heart rate.   Hot baths: A hot water bath not only is soothing for the body but greatly refreshes the mind, too. Adding essential oils like lavender and vanilla to your bathwater can also be very calming. Studies state that adding Epsom salt to your baths can also help relax you. The magnesium sulfate in the salts has been found to greatly calm symptoms of anxiety and depression.   Sunlight: Exposing yourself for sunlight even for 15 minutes a day can cause your body to produce Vitamin D, which plays a major role in combating feelings of anxiety and depression. If you live in areas where there is little or less sunlight, try getting a light box and expose yourself to its light for a few minutes each day.   Chamomile Tea: Drinking three cups of chamomile tea per day, has greatly helped in reducing levels of anxiety. This study states that chamomile contains apigenin and luteolin that help reduce symptoms of anxiety. If you are a tea lover, go to the supermarket and purchase some chamomile tea and start enjoying its calming benefits.   Diet: Mother Nature has bestowed the human race with some great natural, anxiety-fighting food, which is extremely beneficial to the human body. Food rich in Omega-3 fatty acids like walnuts, fish, flax seeds, and other food items, like spinach, turmeric, milk, blueberries, avocado, asparagus and almonds are "brain food." As the name implies, these foods promote brain development and help fight anxiety and depression.   Sleep: Getting a proper eight hours of uninterrupted sleep can be rejuvenating and therapeutic for your body. Proper sleep is the best medicine for most of our mental ailments. Most of the healing process takes place when the human body is sleeping and at rest. Interrupted sleep slows the repairing process in our body causing us to feel tired and on edge. Avoiding screen time and stimulants like caffeine before bedtime is the best way to ensure a good night's sleep.    Decluttering: A cluttered and messy house, workplace, etc.. has also been found to cause stress in some people.  A cluttered place bombards our minds with external stimuli, causing our senses to work overtime, leading the mind to be distracted and feel overloaded. This causes feelings of stress and negativity.  Organizing and decluttering your space and letting go of things you don’t need can be redeeming and therapeutic.   Work and anxiety.   Spending too much time at work and being stressed out can increase anxiety and depression levels. Taking a vacation helps you shift your focus from all that stress to something enjoyable. It has been found that returning to work after a vacation greatly improves your performance and creativity.   Nature: Spending time in nature helps reduce symptoms of anxiety. Being outdoors helps you shift your focus from your anxious thoughts to the scenic nature. Plus, you are able to breathe in fresh air and are exposed to sunlight. All these factors contribute to both a healthy body and healthy mind.   Surrendering control: Studies have found that people who prioritize remaining in control are more prone to anxiety disorders and depression. While letting go of control can be challenging, try to take your imperfections in stride. To err is human, after all.   Therapy: Expressing negativity is important. You can do it by either talking with a friend, family member or counselor. You can even express yourself through writing in a journal or in an art piece. Hoarding negative thoughts can greatly affect your health and can manifest itself in psychosomatic disorders. It is very important that you express these negative emotions.   Seeking help in the form of therapy helps you receive an experienced outlook from a non-biased view point. Therapy is also useful if you don't know who to share your problems with or are far away from friends and family. Speaking to a counselor can help you feel validated and receive the help you need, depending on the severity of your condition. Try BetterHelp to talk with someone about your anxiety, depression and more.   Practicing these suggestions will help you to manage your symptoms in a way that is tailored to you and your personality.   There is hope, recovery is possible and there is help available for you.   I wish you much luck with your next step in managing your anxiety and living a happier life.   In Kindness, Gaynor 
(MA, LCSW)
Answered on 01/20/2022

I’m looking for someone with experience with ARFID / SED

Dear Beka,   Thank you for your message and sharing with me how you've been interacting with yourself, especially on how you've been handling unpleasant feelings and emotions. As you said this has also affected your life significantly. Perhaps by addressing how to handle unpleasant emotions in a healthier manner, we can dive into addressing the issues in your life as well?   Often the experience we've had about anxiety (or any strong emotion such as stress / depression) was so terrible (even physically) that our body sort of become traumatized to it. We naturally become nervous about these unpleasant feelings because we don't like these sensations and experiences. As a result we would do everything we can to avoid / fight these anxious feelings, often using numbing techniques such as using substances or distracting ourselves. Yet only to find that the anxiety gets stronger over time because we have never been able to make peace with it.   Therefore rather than trying to "change" / "fight" / "get rid of" these unpleasant sensations, perhaps the best thing that we can do is to make room for these feelings and even sensations, while staying on track to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment. Floating without judging / blaming ourselves through the anxiety experience, while focusing on making room for anxiety can be helpful.   Here is a short video put up by the author of the book "The Happiness Trap" which does a good job explaining this concept:   Please take some time to watch this and share your thoughts later :) I also highly recommend picking that book as well to supplement this therapy process.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCp1l16GCXI    We as human beings do not like sufferings, therefore often times we would be doing our best to fight it. However just like the analogy of swimming vs floating that we have talked about before, the more we fight it, the faster we sink. While if we can learn to float with these waves, we will realize that we won't sink.   Radical acceptance / Expansion is about accepting of life on life's terms and not resisting what you cannot or choose not to change. Radical Acceptance is about saying yes to life and all that life brings (including all sorts of emotions such as joy, sadness, peace and pain), just as it is without forcing our ways into our lives.   Why do we want to accept life as it is? Because with anything that we do in life that brings us meaning and fulfillment, it always accompany a wide range of emotions, we can't possibly just choose the ones that we like and fight / avoid those that we don't like. Learning to experience all emotions as they are, is a sign that we are living our lives to the fullest.   To do so we must learn to accept (and make room for) any unpleasant sensations, feelings or thoughts that we experience.   We don't want to fight it because the more we fight, the stronger they will come back.   We don't want to avoid it either because the more we avoid, the more we'll be afraid of it.   So the key here is to make room for these sensations, feelings and thoughts, while continue to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment in life.    Learning to "co-exist" with these feelings will naturally reduce the intensity of them.   Floating, is a form of learning to accept these feelings and make room for it.   Let me give you some practical guidelines on what I mean by accepting these feelings and make room for it.   You can look up "expansion technique" under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for more information as well.   How to accept our emotions (and make room for them):   1. OBSERVE. Bring awareness to the feelings in your body.   2. BREATHE. Take a few deep breaths. Breathe into and around them.   3. EXPAND. Make room for these feelings. Create some space for them.   4. ALLOW. Allow them to be there. Make peace with them   Some people find it helpful to silently say to themselves, 'I don't like this feeling, but I have room for it,' or 'It's unpleasant, but I can accept it.'   • When you're feeling an unpleasant emotion, the first step is to take a few slow, deep breaths, and quickly scan your body from head to toe.   • You will probably notice several uncomfortable sensations. Look for the strongest sensation - the one that bothers you the most. For example, it may be a lump in your throat, or a knot in your stomach, or an ache in your chest.   • Focus your attention on that sensation. Observe it curiously, as if you are a friendly scientist, discovering some interesting new phenomenon.   • Observe the sensation carefully. Notice where it starts and where it ends. Learn as much about it as you can. If you had to draw a line around the sensation, what would the outline look like? Is it on the surface of the body, or inside you, or both? How far inside you does it go? Where is the sensation most intense? Where is it weakest? How is it different in the center than around the edges? Is there any pulsation, or vibration within it? Is it light or heavy? Moving or still? What is its temperature?   • Take a few more deep breaths, and let go of the struggle with that sensation. Breathe into it. Imagine your breath flowing in and around it.   • Make room for it. Loosen up around it. Allow it to be there. You don't have to like it or want it. Simply let it be.   • The idea is to observe the sensation - not to think about it. So when your mind starts commenting on what's happening, just say 'Thanks, mind!' and come back to observing.   • You may find this difficult. You may feel a strong urge to fight with it or push it away. If so, just acknowledge this urge, without giving in to it. (Acknowledging is rather like nodding your head in recognition, as if to say 'There you are. I see you.') Once you've acknowledged that urge, bring your attention back to the sensation itself.   • Don't try to get rid of the sensation or alter it. If it changes by itself, that's okay. If it doesn't change, that's okay too. Changing or getting rid of it is not the goal.   • You may need to focus on this sensation for anything from a few seconds to a few minutes, until you completely give up the struggle with it. Be patient. Take as long as you need. You're learning a valuable skill.   • Once you've done this, scan your body again, and see if there's another strong sensation that's bothering you. If so, repeat the procedure with that one.   • You can do this with as many different sensations as you want to. Keep going until you have a sense of no longer struggling with your feelings.   • As you do this exercise one of two things will happen: either your feelings will change - or they won't. It doesn't matter either way. This exercise is not about changing your feelings. It's about accepting them.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

I need help dealing with stress, comparison, feeling like i am never enough

Dear Bobo,   Thank you for your message and sharing your thoughts regarding your insecurity. I can hear the pain behind your words of constantly battling these insecurities.   Through your words I think we have built a common understanding that we have this insecurity about ourselves that we are not good enough. We tend to overly-focus on our weakness and mistakes, as a result we feel inferior compare to others and we never give ourselves the validations that we deserve.   Meanwhile it seems that we look for validations through us being needed / wanted by others, does that mean that we don't know our values if we are not getting feedback from others?   Despite being extremely difficult, admitting your weaknesses can pay dividends in the end. Once you admit to your lack of confidence and overcome these insecurities, these aspects of your life will turn from monsters in your closet to facts that you’ve acknowledged and beaten.   Overcoming insecurities is no easy battle, as there are many factors that cause them, and they’re constantly reinforced by daily events. However the more we challenge these core beliefs that we have and the thoughts that generated from it, the more our self-image will change.   Here are some thoughts I have about how to approach insecurity and things that we don't like about ourselves. Please let me know if they make sense to you.    I'll try to be as practical as I can, maybe this approach can help us put something into practice and begin making some changes.   1- Find the root Think about where you are lacking confidence: Do you think you dislike yourself when you look into the mirror? Are you the last to talk to someone because you think you look bad? Do we feel awkward about ourselves because of the response from others after we have said something?   Consider where these thoughts come from. There may have been certain occurrences in your life that made you think less of yourself. Once you’ve found the root of the problem, it’s much easier to get a handle on the insecurity, because it was most likely created by one or two isolated instances that have no real importance on your current life. Recognize where that insecurity started, and it’ll seem more manageable.   2- Invalidate the problem Once you’ve pinpointed the specific incident that created the crater in your self-image, consider why that occurrence doesn’t prove anything about your life as a whole, and think about the times in your life that prove the opposite. We are often too quick to forget the compliments or positive reinforcements that we’ve received from friends or colleagues, dismissing the kind words as pity or politeness.   Don’t focus on your lack of achievement when your cube mate scores a big account at work. Instead, remember when your boss complimented your own work or just how far you’ve come since you were a bottom-feeder at your company. Recognizing your successes will remind you of how great you are and how lucky your company is to have you. This will help you celebrate your coworkers' successes — and remember that it can only be so long before your next big break.   3- Stop comparing yourself to others It’s easy to become insecure when you constantly compare yourself to seemingly strong, flawless people. For example, if you compare yourself to the person who seems to have a grip on socializing with others and appearing confident, you may come out feeling clumsy and awkward in your encounters with others. But, what you’re likely unaware of is that this person has his/her own set of problems that they have to deal with. Maybe they are covering up their fears of being abandoned therefore they need to keep seeking attention? Instead of focusing on how you stack up against them, focus on what you can do and your skills.   If you can’t measure up to your buddy, maybe you should measure up to your own strengths…   It can be equally as treacherous to compare yourself to your friends. For example, when you see your friend — whose downfalls and ineptitude you are familiar with — succeed, you might end up feeling threatened and insecure about your own abilities.    4- Consider your known strengths A lot of your insecurities come from focusing on the things that you have trouble with. The truth is that everybody has strong and weak points, but successful individuals have learned how to play up their good points — a skill that has helped them flourish. Despite your insecurities, you have achieved a certain level of success in your life because you have great qualities. It's your job to pinpoint and foster those qualities and build a successful life.   Take those qualities, learn to focus on them and remember that there are more ways to use your set of skills than you think. Perhaps you’re nervous about giving a presentation to clients because you’re not very good at making anecdotes or using metaphors. What you seem to forget is that you know the project inside and out; focus on that and answer all of your clients' questions before they ask them. Remembering what you can do will give you the confidence not to choke under pressure.   5- Put your insecurities behind you Once you’re aware that your strengths and weaknesses will balance out in the end, forget about what you lack and draw on where you rock the competition. If you fumbled today at the office meeting, remind yourself of your performance for the past three months. You can always enhance your weaker points at a later date.   If you find that you’re focusing on your insecurities, think of the faults that other people have and how they’re able to get around them or just remind yourself of all the things that you’ve achieved in life. The more you focus on your strengths, the more they’ll be visible to others. In the end you’ll not only be happier, but you’ll be more successful.   The bottom line for beating your insecurities is this: Everyone has them and the key to success is to identify them, invalidate them and move past them. Focus on your accomplishments and recognize that insecurities are usually irrational fears of inadequacy.   Your faults are no more visible or detrimental to your success than anyone else’s, unless you let them get the better of you. Failure tends to be a self-fulfilling prophecy: If you worry that you will fail, your performance will lack and turn your ruminations into a reality.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Until I can afford to start, what are some small therapeutic activities I can do for myself?

I have worked with clients and what seems to work best is mindfulness and deep breathing exercises. Allowing your brain to obtain optimum levels of oxygen and grounding techniques allow you to see things from different perspectives and change your current state of mind. I would encourage everyone, especially those impacted by mental health issues to incorporate a mindfulness and deep breathing/grounding technique into one's daily regiment. Obtaining balance one can move forward, just like riding a bicycle.    You can find a wide array of guided meditations online. However, I personally like to guide clients on the exercise. First it is important to find a comfortable, quiet place to sit. Secondly, place your feet flat on the floor and take a couple of seconds to feel the floor pressing on your feet. (It is best if you do this barefoot!) Also press your back on your seat, and feel the chair making contact with your back, taking a couple of seconds to feel that. Ok, now you will place your palms on your knees, left palm on left knee, right one on right and so on. Take a few seconds to become mindful and aware of your sense of touch and feeling. Thirdly, while touching your knees, focusing on your feet touching the floor and back touching the sofa or chair, you will inhale as deep as you can using your diaphram.    Inhale, and as you hold the air inyour lungs for a couple of seconds, keep focusing on the feet, hands and back making contact to floor, sofa, and knees. Release air very gently and continue to repeat the process for about 3-4 different times. You will begin to feel tension through your body such as in your neck and stomach. It is important to always go back and check in with your feet touching the floor, back on seat, and hands on knees. Continue repeating the inhalation of air and become more aware of the tension. Each time breathing into those parts where you feel most tense, as if to distribut the tension evenly through your body. 
Answered on 01/20/2022

What can I do to feel more connected?

Dear Anonymous2543,   Thank you for your message and sharing with me how you've been interacting with yourself, especially on how you've been handling unpleasant feelings and emotions. As you said this has also affected your life significantly. Perhaps by addressing how to handle unpleasant emotions in a healthier manner, we can dive into addressing the issues in your life as well?   Often the experience we've had about anxiety (or any strong emotion such as stress / depression) was so terrible (even physically) that our body sort of become traumatized to it. We naturally become nervous about these unpleasant feelings because we don't like these sensations and experiences. As a result we would do everything we can to avoid / fight these anxious feelings, often using numbing techniques such as using substances or distracting ourselves. Yet only to find that the anxiety gets stronger over time because we have never been able to make peace with it.   Therefore rather than trying to "change" / "fight" / "get rid of" these unpleasant sensations, perhaps the best thing that we can do is to make room for these feelings and even sensations, while staying on track to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment. Floating without judging / blaming ourselves through the anxiety experience, while focusing on making room for anxiety can be helpful.   Here is a short video put up by the author of the book "The Happiness Trap" which does a good job explaining this concept:   Please take some time to watch this and share your thoughts later :) I also highly recommend picking that book as well to supplement this therapy process.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCp1l16GCXI    We as human beings do not like sufferings, therefore often times we would be doing our best to fight it. However just like the analogy of swimming vs floating that we have talked about before, the more we fight it, the faster we sink. While if we can learn to float with these waves, we will realize that we won't sink.   Radical acceptance / Expansion is about accepting of life on life's terms and not resisting what you cannot or choose not to change. Radical Acceptance is about saying yes to life and all that life brings (including all sorts of emotions such as joy, sadness, peace and pain), just as it is without forcing our ways into our lives.   Why do we want to accept life as it is? Because with anything that we do in life that brings us meaning and fulfillment, it always accompany a wide range of emotions, we can't possibly just choose the ones that we like and fight / avoid those that we don't like. Learning to experience all emotions as they are, is a sign that we are living our lives to the fullest.   To do so we must learn to accept (and make room for) any unpleasant sensations, feelings or thoughts that we experience.   We don't want to fight it because the more we fight, the stronger they will come back.   We don't want to avoid it either because the more we avoid, the more we'll be afraid of it.   So the key here is to make room for these sensations, feelings and thoughts, while continue to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment in life.    Learning to "co-exist" with these feelings will naturally reduce the intensity of them.   Floating, is a form of learning to accept these feelings and make room for it.   Let me give you some practical guidelines on what I mean by accepting these feelings and make room for it.   You can look up "expansion technique" under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for more information as well.   How to accept our emotions (and make room for them):   1. OBSERVE. Bring awareness to the feelings in your body.   2. BREATHE. Take a few deep breaths. Breathe into and around them.   3. EXPAND. Make room for these feelings. Create some space for them.   4. ALLOW. Allow them to be there. Make peace with them   Some people find it helpful to silently say to themselves, 'I don't like this feeling, but I have room for it,' or 'It's unpleasant, but I can accept it.'   • When you're feeling an unpleasant emotion, the first step is to take a few slow, deep breaths, and quickly scan your body from head to toe.   • You will probably notice several uncomfortable sensations. Look for the strongest sensation - the one that bothers you the most. For example, it may be a lump in your throat, or a knot in your stomach, or an ache in your chest.   • Focus your attention on that sensation. Observe it curiously, as if you are a friendly scientist, discovering some interesting new phenomenon.   • Observe the sensation carefully. Notice where it starts and where it ends. Learn as much about it as you can. If you had to draw a line around the sensation, what would the outline look like? Is it on the surface of the body, or inside you, or both? How far inside you does it go? Where is the sensation most intense? Where is it weakest? How is it different in the center than around the edges? Is there any pulsation, or vibration within it? Is it light or heavy? Moving or still? What is its temperature?   • Take a few more deep breaths, and let go of the struggle with that sensation. Breathe into it. Imagine your breath flowing in and around it.   • Make room for it. Loosen up around it. Allow it to be there. You don't have to like it or want it. Simply let it be.   • The idea is to observe the sensation - not to think about it. So when your mind starts commenting on what's happening, just say 'Thanks, mind!' and come back to observing.   • You may find this difficult. You may feel a strong urge to fight with it or push it away. If so, just acknowledge this urge, without giving in to it. (Acknowledging is rather like nodding your head in recognition, as if to say 'There you are. I see you.') Once you've acknowledged that urge, bring your attention back to the sensation itself.   • Don't try to get rid of the sensation or alter it. If it changes by itself, that's okay. If it doesn't change, that's okay too. Changing or getting rid of it is not the goal.   • You may need to focus on this sensation for anything from a few seconds to a few minutes, until you completely give up the struggle with it. Be patient. Take as long as you need. You're learning a valuable skill.   • Once you've done this, scan your body again, and see if there's another strong sensation that's bothering you. If so, repeat the procedure with that one.   • You can do this with as many different sensations as you want to. Keep going until you have a sense of no longer struggling with your feelings.   • As you do this exercise one of two things will happen: either your feelings will change - or they won't. It doesn't matter either way. This exercise is not about changing your feelings. It's about accepting them.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Life direction

I am so sorry to hear that you are struggling with anxiety attacks and feeling stuck in your life.  It will be important to recognize when your feelings have a purpose versus when they do not.  We of course want positive feelings in our lives, but sometimes negative feelings are there for a reason and we need to live out that purpose in order for it to get better.  If we do not live out the purpose of our feelings, it likely leads us to feel worse.  For example, something as simple as having anxiety about needing to get the chores done has the purpose of getting us motivated to get the chores done.  Therefore, if we do not live out that purpose and the chores remain undone, that can lead to more bad feelings, such as, “I am lazy” or “I am worthless.”  This is a simple example of how if we do not pay attention to our feelings and live out the purpose, they can become much, much worse.  So, I would encourage you to try and separate out the thoughts that have a purpose from the thoughts that do not have a purpose and are more intrusive.    For the ones that do have a purpose, it can be helpful to allow yourself to think through the anxious thoughts because anxiety has a nasty way of going to the worst possible scenario.  If you can wrap your head around that scenario, it can make it less scary.  For example, I had a client that was very anxious daily about being single for the rest of his life.  Thinking to that extreme is clearly anxiety and it just lingers there.  So, then he was able to think through that scenario and come up with a plan to make it less scary.  He then came up with that if he really is going to be single the rest of his life, which is highly unlikely, he is going to work towards being able to live close to the ocean since that is a dream of his.  Thinking about it now does not make him as scared because he recognizes he could be happy with that. So, try to think through specific things you are anxious about that have a purpose and make sure you have a specific plan on how to improve those things. For example, having a specific plan for how to address specific anxieties you have that trigger attacks.   Intrusive thoughts tend to not have a purpose and it can be really helpful to try and overpower those before they are accepted as truths.   We can have power over our thoughts and I want to help you not engage in these thoughts that make you so upset.  The easiest example of this that I can think of is if I went skydiving.  If I went skydiving I would have some obvious, rational, anxious thoughts.  If I really have a desire to skydive though I will need to not engage in those thoughts.  I might have thoughts such as, "My parachute could fail, I will hit the ground, I am going to pass out, etc."  However, since I really want to follow through with skydiving, I would want to stop those thoughts in their tracks with, "I know this is going to be really fun, they inspect the parachutes ahead of time, people hardly ever get hurt doing this, etc."  By focusing on those thoughts and not engaging in the others, I would be able to follow through with skydiving. Try to sort through any thoughts that get you down about yourself and that you can’t handle all of this and try to overpower those.  These types of thoughts are very common when dealing with this kind of uncertainty around life choices.            As you do those processes it can be helpful to validate yourself as someone of worth and that has been able to get through challenges in your past.  Something that could be helpful for you is what I like to call centering thoughts.  These are thoughts that are predetermined and unique to you for you to turn to in low moments.  They need to be powerful enough to bring you back to your center.  It is important that these thoughts are accessible for you to look at when you need to.  Some clients prefer to read and re-read them and some prefer to write and re-write them until they feel better.  I have clients that write these somewhere they will see daily such as their bathroom mirror or phone background, while others simply have them in their phone to pull out when they need to.  An example of a centering thought would be from a client I had that related to nautical themed things and her thought was, "I will not let this sink me."  Another example is from an Olympic skier that actually had difficulties with negative thinking getting in the way of her performance so she went to therapy.  She mentioned that she learned about centering thoughts to battle all of the people telling her she “should be” or “should do.”  To battle those thoughts, she uses the simple centering thought of, “I am.”  She can then remind herself that she is good enough, that she is confident, and that she does want to still compete, which really affirms her own feelings and not others.  Hopefully you can come up with something that helps validate your worth and abilities to move forward.       I hope that some of this is helpful and that you can apply it to your circumstances.  I hope that you can lean on some family and/or friends through this.  Doing so can help take weight off of your shoulders as well as hopefully get some valuable advice from them. Try to take the healing one day at a time and adding one positive thing back into your life each day. I wish you all the best and I hope that you are staying safe.
(MA, LPC, NCC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

Hello, My name is Elda and I have anxiety. Last year in albania happened an earthquake, the first

Dear Alba,   Thank you for your message and sharing with me how you've been interacting with yourself, especially on how you've been handling unpleasant feelings and emotions. As you said this has also affected your life significantly. Perhaps by addressing how to handle unpleasant emotions in a healthier manner, we can dive into addressing the issues in your life as well?   Often the experience we've had about anxiety (or any strong emotion such as stress / depression) was so terrible (even physically) that our body sort of become traumatized to it. We naturally become nervous about these unpleasant feelings because we don't like these sensations and experiences. As a result we would do everything we can to avoid / fight these anxious feelings, often using numbing techniques such as using substances or distracting ourselves. Yet only to find that the anxiety gets stronger over time because we have never been able to make peace with it.   Therefore rather than trying to "change" / "fight" / "get rid of" these unpleasant sensations, perhaps the best thing that we can do is to make room for these feelings and even sensations, while staying on track to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment. Floating without judging / blaming ourselves through the anxiety experience, while focusing on making room for anxiety can be helpful.   Here is a short video put up by the author of the book "The Happiness Trap" which does a good job explaining this concept:   Please take some time to watch this and share your thoughts later :) I also highly recommend picking that book as well to supplement this therapy process.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCp1l16GCXI    We as human beings do not like sufferings, therefore often times we would be doing our best to fight it. However just like the analogy of swimming vs floating that we have talked about before, the more we fight it, the faster we sink. While if we can learn to float with these waves, we will realize that we won't sink.   Radical acceptance / Expansion is about accepting of life on life's terms and not resisting what you cannot or choose not to change. Radical Acceptance is about saying yes to life and all that life brings (including all sorts of emotions such as joy, sadness, peace and pain), just as it is without forcing our ways into our lives.   Why do we want to accept life as it is? Because with anything that we do in life that brings us meaning and fulfillment, it always accompany a wide range of emotions, we can't possibly just choose the ones that we like and fight / avoid those that we don't like. Learning to experience all emotions as they are, is a sign that we are living our lives to the fullest.   To do so we must learn to accept (and make room for) any unpleasant sensations, feelings or thoughts that we experience.   We don't want to fight it because the more we fight, the stronger they will come back.   We don't want to avoid it either because the more we avoid, the more we'll be afraid of it.   So the key here is to make room for these sensations, feelings and thoughts, while continue to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment in life.    Learning to "co-exist" with these feelings will naturally reduce the intensity of them.   Floating, is a form of learning to accept these feelings and make room for it.   Let me give you some practical guidelines on what I mean by accepting these feelings and make room for it.   You can look up "expansion technique" under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for more information as well.   How to accept our emotions (and make room for them):   1. OBSERVE. Bring awareness to the feelings in your body.   2. BREATHE. Take a few deep breaths. Breathe into and around them.   3. EXPAND. Make room for these feelings. Create some space for them.   4. ALLOW. Allow them to be there. Make peace with them   Some people find it helpful to silently say to themselves, 'I don't like this feeling, but I have room for it,' or 'It's unpleasant, but I can accept it.'   • When you're feeling an unpleasant emotion, the first step is to take a few slow, deep breaths, and quickly scan your body from head to toe.   • You will probably notice several uncomfortable sensations. Look for the strongest sensation - the one that bothers you the most. For example, it may be a lump in your throat, or a knot in your stomach, or an ache in your chest.   • Focus your attention on that sensation. Observe it curiously, as if you are a friendly scientist, discovering some interesting new phenomenon.   • Observe the sensation carefully. Notice where it starts and where it ends. Learn as much about it as you can. If you had to draw a line around the sensation, what would the outline look like? Is it on the surface of the body, or inside you, or both? How far inside you does it go? Where is the sensation most intense? Where is it weakest? How is it different in the center than around the edges? Is there any pulsation, or vibration within it? Is it light or heavy? Moving or still? What is its temperature?   • Take a few more deep breaths, and let go of the struggle with that sensation. Breathe into it. Imagine your breath flowing in and around it.   • Make room for it. Loosen up around it. Allow it to be there. You don't have to like it or want it. Simply let it be.   • The idea is to observe the sensation - not to think about it. So when your mind starts commenting on what's happening, just say 'Thanks, mind!' and come back to observing.   • You may find this difficult. You may feel a strong urge to fight with it or push it away. If so, just acknowledge this urge, without giving in to it. (Acknowledging is rather like nodding your head in recognition, as if to say 'There you are. I see you.') Once you've acknowledged that urge, bring your attention back to the sensation itself.   • Don't try to get rid of the sensation or alter it. If it changes by itself, that's okay. If it doesn't change, that's okay too. Changing or getting rid of it is not the goal.   • You may need to focus on this sensation for anything from a few seconds to a few minutes, until you completely give up the struggle with it. Be patient. Take as long as you need. You're learning a valuable skill.   • Once you've done this, scan your body again, and see if there's another strong sensation that's bothering you. If so, repeat the procedure with that one.   • You can do this with as many different sensations as you want to. Keep going until you have a sense of no longer struggling with your feelings.   • As you do this exercise one of two things will happen: either your feelings will change - or they won't. It doesn't matter either way. This exercise is not about changing your feelings. It's about accepting them.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022

How do I overcome feeling completely paralyzed by fear?

Hello Mike, Thanks for reaching out to The Betterhelp Platform with your question: How do I overcome feeling completely paralyzed by fear? I will share some information about anxiety and fear and some steps you can take to see if you can make some changes.  I would strongly urge you to consider reaching out to your medical provider for further assessment and maybe for you both to discuss a course of treatment that might be effective for you. How to overcome fear and anxiety Fear is one of the most powerful emotions. It has a very strong effect on your mind and body. Fear can create strong signals of response when we’re in emergencies – for instance, if you were in car accident or are being attacked. It can also take effect when you’re faced with non-dangerous events, like exams, public speaking, a new job, a date, or even a party. It’s a natural response to a threat that can be either perceived or real. Anxiety is a word we use for some types of fear that are usually to do with the thought of a threat or something going wrong in the future, rather than right now. Fear and anxiety can last for a short time and then pass, but they can also last much longer and you can get stuck with them. In some cases they can take over your life, affecting your ability to eat, sleep, concentrate, travel, enjoy life, or even leave the house or go to work or school. This can hold you back from doing things you want or need to do, and it also affects your health. Some people become overwhelmed by fear and want to avoid situations that might make them frightened or anxious. It can be hard to break this cycle, but there are lots of ways to do it. You can learn to feel less fearful and to cope with fear so that it doesn’t stop you from living. What makes you afraid? Lots of things make us feel afraid. Being afraid of some things – like fires – can keep you safe. Fearing failure can make you try to do well so that you won’t fail, but it can also stop you doing well if the feeling is too strong. What you’re afraid of and how you act when you’re afraid of something can vary per person. Just knowing what makes you afraid and why can be the first step to sorting out problems with fear.   What makes you anxious? Because anxiety is a type of fear, the things we’ve described about fear above are also true for anxiety. The word ‘anxiety’ tends to be used to describe worry, or when fear is nagging and persists over time. It is used when the fear is about something in the future rather than what is happening right now. Anxiety is a word often used by health professionals when they’re describing persistent fear. The ways that you feel when you’re frightened and anxious are very similar, as the basic emotion is the same. What do fear and anxiety feel like? When you feel frightened or seriously anxious, your mind and body work very quickly. These are some of the things that might happen: Your heart beats very fast – maybe it feels irregular You breathe very fast Your muscles feel weak You sweat a lot Your stomach churns or your bowels feel loose You find it hard to concentrate on anything else You feel dizzy You feel frozen to the spot You can’t eat You have hot and cold sweats You get a dry mouth You get very tense muscles These things occur because your body, sensing fear, is preparing you for an emergency, so it makes your blood flow to the muscles, increases blood sugar, and gives you the mental ability to focus on the thing that your body perceives as a threat. With anxiety, in the longer term, you may have some of the above symptoms as well as a more nagging sense of fear, and you may get irritable, have trouble sleeping, develop headaches, or have trouble getting on with work and planning for the future; you might have problems having sex, and might lose self-confidence. Why do I feel like this when I’m not in any real danger? Early humans needed the fast, powerful responses that fear causes, as they were often in situations of physical danger; however, we no longer face the same threats in modern-day living. Despite this, our minds and bodies still work in the same way as our early ancestors, and we have the same reactions to our modern worries about bills, travel and social situations. But we can’t run away from or physically attack these problems! The physical feelings of fear can be scary in themselves – especially if you are experiencing them and you don’t know why, or if they seem out of proportion to the situation. Instead of alerting you to a danger and preparing you to respond to it, your fear or anxiety can kick in for any perceived threat, which could be imaginary or minor. Why won’t my fear go away and leave me feeling normal again? Fear may be a one-off feeling when you are faced with something unfamiliar. But it can also be an everyday, long-lasting problem – even if you can’t put your finger on why. Some people feel a constant sense of anxiety all the time, without any particular trigger. There are plenty of triggers for fear in everyday life, and you can’t always work out exactly why you are frightened or how likely you are to be harmed. Even if you can see how out of proportion a fear is, the emotional part of your brain keeps sending danger signals to your body. Sometimes you need mental and physical ways of tackling fear. What is a panic attack? A panic attack is when you feel overwhelmed by the physical and mental feelings of fear – the signs listed under ‘What do fear and anxiety feel like?’ People who have panic attacks say that they find it hard to breathe, and they may worry that they’re having a heart attack or are going to lose control of their body.  What is a phobia? A phobia is an extreme fear of a particular animal, thing, place or situation. People with phobias have an overwhelming need to avoid any contact with the specific cause of the anxiety or fear. The thought of coming into contact with the cause of the phobia makes you anxious or panicky. How do I know if I need help? Fear and anxiety can affect all of us every now and then. It is only when it is severe and long-lasting that doctors class it as a mental health problem. If you feel anxious all the time for several weeks, or if it feels like your fears are taking over your life, then it’s a good idea to ask your doctor for help, or try one of the websites or numbers listed at the back of this booklet. The same is true if a phobia is causing problems in your daily life, or if you are experiencing panic attacks. How can I help myself? Face your fear if you can If you always avoid situations that scare you, you might stop doing things you want or need to do. You won’t be able to test out whether the situation is always as bad as you expect, so you miss the chance to work out how to manage your fears and reduce your anxiety. Anxiety problems tend to increase if you get into this pattern. Exposing yourself to your fears can be an effective way of overcoming this anxiety. Know yourself Try to learn more about your fear or anxiety. Keep an anxiety diary or thought record to note down when it happens and what happens. You can try setting yourself small, achievable goals for facing your fears. You could carry with you a list of things that help at times when you are likely to be become frightened or anxious. This can be an effective way of addressing the underlying beliefs that are behind your anxiety. Try to learn more about your fear or anxiety. Keep a record of when it happens and what happens. Exercise Increase the amount of exercise you do. Exercise requires some concentration, and this can take your mind off your fear and anxiety. Relax Learning relaxation techniques can help you with the mental and physical feelings of fear. It can help just to drop your shoulders and breathe deeply. Or imagine yourself in a relaxing place. You could also try learning things like yoga, meditation, massage, or listening to mental health wellbeing podcasts.  Healthy eating Eat lots of fruit and vegetables, and try to avoid too much sugar. Resulting dips in your blood sugar can give you anxious feelings. Try to avoid drinking too much tea and coffee, as caffeine can increase anxiety levels. Avoid alcohol, or drink in moderation It’s very common for people to drink when they feel nervous. Some people call alcohol ‘Dutch courage’, but the after-effects of alcohol can make you feel even more afraid or anxious. Complementary therapies Some people find that complementary therapies or exercises, such as relaxation techniques, meditation, yoga, or t’ai chi, help them to deal with their anxiety. Faith/spirituality If you are religious or spiritual, this can give you a way of feeling connected to something bigger than yourself. Faith can provide a way of coping with everyday stress, and attending church and other faith groups can connect you with a valuable support network. How do I get help? Talking therapies Talking therapies, like counselling or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, are very effective for people with anxiety problems, including on line options Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, which can take you through a series of self-help exercises. Medication Drug treatments are used to provide short-term help, rather than looking at the root of the anxiety problems. Drugs may be most useful when they are combined with other treatments or support. Support groups You can learn a lot about managing anxiety from asking other people who have experienced it. Local support groups or self-help groups bring together people with similar experiences so that they can hear each other’s stories, share tips and encourage each other to try out new ways to manage themselves. Your doctor or library will have details of support groups near you.   Recovery is possible.  There is hope and help for you.   I hope you consider reaching out for help from your doctor or to a professional mental health therapist.    I wish you much luck! In Kindness, Gaynor 
(MA, LCSW)
Answered on 01/20/2022

How can I get my mind back from dark thoughts?

Dear wonderful Nature Girl, thank you so much for reaching out, it's very brave.    There are a tun of facts I'm missing to give you an answer that is fit for you. So I'm sorry if some of this isn't relevant.    For example, when is the last time  you took drugs, what did you take, and what the bad experience was. It would be also important to know when the experience was.    Other than that you're also dealing with depleted sense of resilience, and panic attacks. The panic attacks, do  you know if there's a trigger? When do they happen, how often do they happen, when do they get worse or get better, what tools do you already have to manage it and so forth. All those questions also sorta go with the general question of managing challenging situations.    Each person has a battery of resilience, and we use it all day. Starting from stubbing our toe, and right up until traumatic events. And if we don't refill it, the battery will eventually die out. And for that we need to refill it on a regular basis. It sorta sounds like yours is running on empty.    There are a lot of things you could do to refill your battery, so if I could invite you to google 'Basic PH therapy", there's a list of things there that might help.    I'd also like to invite you to google "mindful breathing exercises". Breathing properly has been found to lower the intensity, duration and frequency of panic attacks, so it's really a tool for life.    Long term, I really recommend therapy, if you can. But for now, between the mindful breathing that I hope you can practice as often as possible, and the Basic Ph things you could start doing now in order to fill your battery -- you might feel somewhat better pretty soon.   I know that what you're going through right now is very challenging and maybe even very painful or uncomfortable. You're very brave for trying to get better, and every day that you still fight for yourself - you're glorious beyond words. Thank you for being you. It's an honor to have gotten to know you a bit. 
Answered on 01/20/2022

How do I manage my anxiety?

Thank you for the question. You are right in that there are different forms of anxiety that fall on a spectrum. I can see that you are trying to find your triggers for anxiety and I can understand why you are doing this. All forms of anxiety can interfere with our daily acitviteis and functioning. Gernalized anxiety is when there is daily interference without needing to have a direct trigger. Anxiety can also effect panic attacks; which it sounds that you are having and are severe. Panic attacks are very scary as the symptoms can completely take over in physical, mental, and emotional symtpoms. It can feel that they are happening for a long period or are not going to end when we are going through them. While this is not rational, it is the thought process that takes over.   This can happen to individuals through different times and life phases. It seems that for you, you had never struggled with anxiety before this current time. It sounds that one of the biggest triggers for you is managing your career with the workload of grad school and the responsiblites of your marriage. This can be challenging to find the balance. It is important to communicate this with your husband to see if there can be a plan where he could provide additional support to you in ways that you need. This may be him managing certain housheold tasks or meal times to give you more time to feel that you can focus on your school work. I also encourage you to talk about the challenges that you are feeling with positive supports. Processing your emotions is a large part of dealing with the chronic and persistant forms of anxiety. This could also help to decrease the panic attacks as these seem to be triggered during periods that you are feeling high levels of stress.    I also want to address your thoughts of suicidal ideations. I know that you expressed that you would never do this as you think about yourself, your marriage, others that are important to you. It could be very beneficial for you to talk about this with a professional to help work through how you are feeling and get the appropriate treatment that you need. Suicidal ideations can be helped and treated by professionals. 
Answered on 01/20/2022

Can I get a prescription for my anxiety?

Dear John,   Thank you for your message and sharing with me how you've been interacting with yourself, especially on how you've been handling unpleasant feelings and emotions. As you said this has also affected your life significantly. Perhaps by addressing how to handle unpleasant emotions in a healthier manner, we can dive into addressing the issues in your life as well?   If you are looking for prescriptions for anxiety, I would definitely recommend that you seek help from a local physician who can do that for you. Online counseling isn't the place to prescribe medications.   Often the experience we've had about anxiety (or any strong emotion such as stress / depression) was so terrible (even physically) that our body sort of become traumatized to it. We naturally become nervous about these unpleasant feelings because we don't like these sensations and experiences. As a result we would do everything we can to avoid / fight these anxious feelings, often using numbing techniques such as using substances or distracting ourselves. Yet only to find that the anxiety gets stronger over time because we have never been able to make peace with it.   Therefore rather than trying to "change" / "fight" / "get rid of" these unpleasant sensations, perhaps the best thing that we can do is to make room for these feelings and even sensations, while staying on track to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment. Floating without judging / blaming ourselves through the anxiety experience, while focusing on making room for anxiety can be helpful.   Here is a short video put up by the author of the book "The Happiness Trap" which does a good job explaining this concept:   Please take some time to watch this and share your thoughts later :) I also highly recommend picking that book as well to supplement this therapy process.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCp1l16GCXI    We as human beings do not like sufferings, therefore often times we would be doing our best to fight it. However just like the analogy of swimming vs floating that we have talked about before, the more we fight it, the faster we sink. While if we can learn to float with these waves, we will realize that we won't sink.   Radical acceptance / Expansion is about accepting of life on life's terms and not resisting what you cannot or choose not to change. Radical Acceptance is about saying yes to life and all that life brings (including all sorts of emotions such as joy, sadness, peace and pain), just as it is without forcing our ways into our lives.   Why do we want to accept life as it is? Because with anything that we do in life that brings us meaning and fulfillment, it always accompany a wide range of emotions, we can't possibly just choose the ones that we like and fight / avoid those that we don't like. Learning to experience all emotions as they are, is a sign that we are living our lives to the fullest.   To do so we must learn to accept (and make room for) any unpleasant sensations, feelings or thoughts that we experience.   We don't want to fight it because the more we fight, the stronger they will come back.   We don't want to avoid it either because the more we avoid, the more we'll be afraid of it.   So the key here is to make room for these sensations, feelings and thoughts, while continue to do what brings us meaning and fulfillment in life.    Learning to "co-exist" with these feelings will naturally reduce the intensity of them.   Floating, is a form of learning to accept these feelings and make room for it.   Let me give you some practical guidelines on what I mean by accepting these feelings and make room for it.   You can look up "expansion technique" under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for more information as well.   How to accept our emotions (and make room for them):   1. OBSERVE. Bring awareness to the feelings in your body.   2. BREATHE. Take a few deep breaths. Breathe into and around them.   3. EXPAND. Make room for these feelings. Create some space for them.   4. ALLOW. Allow them to be there. Make peace with them   Some people find it helpful to silently say to themselves, 'I don't like this feeling, but I have room for it,' or 'It's unpleasant, but I can accept it.'   • When you're feeling an unpleasant emotion, the first step is to take a few slow, deep breaths, and quickly scan your body from head to toe.   • You will probably notice several uncomfortable sensations. Look for the strongest sensation - the one that bothers you the most. For example, it may be a lump in your throat, or a knot in your stomach, or an ache in your chest.   • Focus your attention on that sensation. Observe it curiously, as if you are a friendly scientist, discovering some interesting new phenomenon.   • Observe the sensation carefully. Notice where it starts and where it ends. Learn as much about it as you can. If you had to draw a line around the sensation, what would the outline look like? Is it on the surface of the body, or inside you, or both? How far inside you does it go? Where is the sensation most intense? Where is it weakest? How is it different in the center than around the edges? Is there any pulsation, or vibration within it? Is it light or heavy? Moving or still? What is its temperature?   • Take a few more deep breaths, and let go of the struggle with that sensation. Breathe into it. Imagine your breath flowing in and around it.   • Make room for it. Loosen up around it. Allow it to be there. You don't have to like it or want it. Simply let it be.   • The idea is to observe the sensation - not to think about it. So when your mind starts commenting on what's happening, just say 'Thanks, mind!' and come back to observing.   • You may find this difficult. You may feel a strong urge to fight with it or push it away. If so, just acknowledge this urge, without giving in to it. (Acknowledging is rather like nodding your head in recognition, as if to say 'There you are. I see you.') Once you've acknowledged that urge, bring your attention back to the sensation itself.   • Don't try to get rid of the sensation or alter it. If it changes by itself, that's okay. If it doesn't change, that's okay too. Changing or getting rid of it is not the goal.   • You may need to focus on this sensation for anything from a few seconds to a few minutes, until you completely give up the struggle with it. Be patient. Take as long as you need. You're learning a valuable skill.   • Once you've done this, scan your body again, and see if there's another strong sensation that's bothering you. If so, repeat the procedure with that one.   • You can do this with as many different sensations as you want to. Keep going until you have a sense of no longer struggling with your feelings.   • As you do this exercise one of two things will happen: either your feelings will change - or they won't. It doesn't matter either way. This exercise is not about changing your feelings. It's about accepting them.   Looking forward to talking with you more, Jono
(MSW, LICSW, LMHC)
Answered on 01/20/2022